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Neural differentiation of human embryonic stem cells in a microfluidic system

Isaksson, Marc LU (2015) EEM820 20151
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Abstract
The development of the human embryonic brain is a complex process involving several biological cues which interact to generate speci_c neural cells and anatomical features. There are still many questions to be addressed regarding biological key mechanisms which in case of malfunction might disturb the development of the brain. Animal models such as rats and mice have been used to get a better understanding of these biological mechanisms. However, it is essential to _nd a more suitable model system as the human brain is more complex and bigger in size.
The aim of this master thesis project is to create a microuidic system capable of generating a model of the early developing brain from human embryonic stem cells.
Various microfabrication... (More)
The development of the human embryonic brain is a complex process involving several biological cues which interact to generate speci_c neural cells and anatomical features. There are still many questions to be addressed regarding biological key mechanisms which in case of malfunction might disturb the development of the brain. Animal models such as rats and mice have been used to get a better understanding of these biological mechanisms. However, it is essential to _nd a more suitable model system as the human brain is more complex and bigger in size.
The aim of this master thesis project is to create a microuidic system capable of generating a model of the early developing brain from human embryonic stem cells.
Various microfabrication methods for creating the microuidic system are presented along with simulations and uorescence experiments. Also, stem cell di_erentiation experiments are performed and analyzed.
Results show that the microuidic system can be used to create di_erent cell types that constitute the early brain in a single cell culture. Simulations indicate that it is possible to test whether the design of the microuidic system corresponds to the functional requirements.
A future optimized microuidic system could enable the generation of more neural cell
types and also recreate the anatomy of the early human brain. (Less)
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author
Isaksson, Marc LU
supervisor
organization
course
EEM820 20151
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
language
English
additional info
2015-06
id
5462225
date added to LUP
2015-06-01 14:11:18
date last changed
2015-06-08 11:11:38
@misc{5462225,
  abstract     = {The development of the human embryonic brain is a complex process involving several biological cues which interact to generate speci_c neural cells and anatomical features. There are still many questions to be addressed regarding biological key mechanisms which in case of malfunction might disturb the development of the brain. Animal models such as rats and mice have been used to get a better understanding of these biological mechanisms. However, it is essential to _nd a more suitable model system as the human brain is more complex and bigger in size.
The aim of this master thesis project is to create a microuidic system capable of generating a model of the early developing brain from human embryonic stem cells.
Various microfabrication methods for creating the microuidic system are presented along with simulations and uorescence experiments. Also, stem cell di_erentiation experiments are performed and analyzed.
Results show that the microuidic system can be used to create di_erent cell types that constitute the early brain in a single cell culture. Simulations indicate that it is possible to test whether the design of the microuidic system corresponds to the functional requirements.
A future optimized microuidic system could enable the generation of more neural cell
types and also recreate the anatomy of the early human brain.},
  author       = {Isaksson, Marc},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Neural differentiation of human embryonic stem cells in a microfluidic system},
  year         = {2015},
}