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TOWARDS A DYNAMIC THEORY OF CAUSATION, EFFECTUATION AND BRICOLAGE: A STUDY OF THE PROCESS OF PARTNERSHIP SELECTION FOR AN OPEN INNOVATION COMMUNITY

Biehl Stürmer, Karen LU and Onland, Tijmen LU (2015) ENTN39 20151
Department of Business Administration
Abstract
The purpose of this study is twofold. Firstly, it aims to contribute to research by creating an understanding of how partners are selected in practice by an open innovation community. Secondly, it aims to contribute to research by building on the theories of causation and effectuation, as well as bricolage - a novel approach to partnership selection. We took an interpretive epistemological stance, iterating between an inductive and deductive research approach, to study a specific case. Data is obtained through in-depth qualitative interviews and analysed in a longitudinal manner. As the results, we have unveiled four findings for the process of partnership selection in an open innovation community in the lenses of causation, effectuation... (More)
The purpose of this study is twofold. Firstly, it aims to contribute to research by creating an understanding of how partners are selected in practice by an open innovation community. Secondly, it aims to contribute to research by building on the theories of causation and effectuation, as well as bricolage - a novel approach to partnership selection. We took an interpretive epistemological stance, iterating between an inductive and deductive research approach, to study a specific case. Data is obtained through in-depth qualitative interviews and analysed in a longitudinal manner. As the results, we have unveiled four findings for the process of partnership selection in an open innovation community in the lenses of causation, effectuation and bricolage. First, the process of partnership selection is dynamic, manifesting different levels of the theories throughout the process. Second, the three theories are intertwined. Third, individual behaviour in this process is not linear and locked to one theory, as it can change due to emerging interaction. Fourth and final, causation is overrated by research, acknowledging the need for further research in the eminent theories of effectuation and bricolage. Practical implications include asking managers to be open minded and flexible towards a means-driven and bricolage approach in the process of partnership selection. (Less)
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author
Biehl Stürmer, Karen LU and Onland, Tijmen LU
supervisor
organization
course
ENTN39 20151
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
partnership selection, open innovation, community, causation, effectuation, bricolage
language
English
id
5473200
date added to LUP
2015-06-26 16:33:48
date last changed
2015-06-26 16:33:48
@misc{5473200,
  abstract     = {The purpose of this study is twofold. Firstly, it aims to contribute to research by creating an understanding of how partners are selected in practice by an open innovation community. Secondly, it aims to contribute to research by building on the theories of causation and effectuation, as well as bricolage - a novel approach to partnership selection. We took an interpretive epistemological stance, iterating between an inductive and deductive research approach, to study a specific case. Data is obtained through in-depth qualitative interviews and analysed in a longitudinal manner. As the results, we have unveiled four findings for the process of partnership selection in an open innovation community in the lenses of causation, effectuation and bricolage. First, the process of partnership selection is dynamic, manifesting different levels of the theories throughout the process. Second, the three theories are intertwined. Third, individual behaviour in this process is not linear and locked to one theory, as it can change due to emerging interaction. Fourth and final, causation is overrated by research, acknowledging the need for further research in the eminent theories of effectuation and bricolage. Practical implications include asking managers to be open minded and flexible towards a means-driven and bricolage approach in the process of partnership selection.},
  author       = {Biehl Stürmer, Karen and Onland, Tijmen},
  keyword      = {partnership selection,open innovation,community,causation,effectuation,bricolage},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {TOWARDS A DYNAMIC THEORY OF CAUSATION, EFFECTUATION AND BRICOLAGE: A STUDY OF THE PROCESS OF PARTNERSHIP SELECTION FOR AN OPEN INNOVATION COMMUNITY},
  year         = {2015},
}