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The Chinese Maritime Frontier: 10th — 16th Century

Gunther, Michael LU (2015) EKHM52 20151
Department of Economic History
Abstract (Swedish)
China’s maritime development during 200 B.C. to 1600 A.D. is usually
vastly overlooked compared to its counterpart: Europe. Traditionally, Europe’s
maritime development has been associated as the frontier of maritime growth,
which began around the sixteenth century and eventually evolved into modern
economic growth. However, the thesis challenges that Europe was the frontier
of maritime growth; rather, China was the leader of maritime development and
trade, until seventeenth century. Not only did China present growth of the
industry, but highly developed regionalization and maritime technology that
contributed till the twenty century. China created an infrastructure of trade,
commerce, institutions, human capital, innovations, and... (More)
China’s maritime development during 200 B.C. to 1600 A.D. is usually
vastly overlooked compared to its counterpart: Europe. Traditionally, Europe’s
maritime development has been associated as the frontier of maritime growth,
which began around the sixteenth century and eventually evolved into modern
economic growth. However, the thesis challenges that Europe was the frontier
of maritime growth; rather, China was the leader of maritime development and
trade, until seventeenth century. Not only did China present growth of the
industry, but highly developed regionalization and maritime technology that
contributed till the twenty century. China created an infrastructure of trade,
commerce, institutions, human capital, innovations, and regional development
in the maritime industry before Europe knocked on China’s door. In exploring
the development of the maritime industry in China a different measuring stick
is used: rather than Neoclassical, Smithian Growth Model is used along with
institutional and spatial proximity approaches to explore if the Chinese formed
a maritime frontier. (Less)
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author
Gunther, Michael LU
supervisor
organization
course
EKHM52 20151
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Smithian Growth, Institutions, Maritime, China, South East Asia, Proximity, Shipbuilding, Navigation, Asian Mediterranean, pre-modern
language
English
id
5473965
date added to LUP
2015-06-25 12:41:18
date last changed
2015-06-25 12:41:18
@misc{5473965,
  abstract     = {China’s maritime development during 200 B.C. to 1600 A.D. is usually
vastly overlooked compared to its counterpart: Europe. Traditionally, Europe’s
maritime development has been associated as the frontier of maritime growth,
which began around the sixteenth century and eventually evolved into modern
economic growth. However, the thesis challenges that Europe was the frontier
of maritime growth; rather, China was the leader of maritime development and
trade, until seventeenth century. Not only did China present growth of the
industry, but highly developed regionalization and maritime technology that
contributed till the twenty century. China created an infrastructure of trade,
commerce, institutions, human capital, innovations, and regional development
in the maritime industry before Europe knocked on China’s door. In exploring
the development of the maritime industry in China a different measuring stick
is used: rather than Neoclassical, Smithian Growth Model is used along with
institutional and spatial proximity approaches to explore if the Chinese formed
a maritime frontier.},
  author       = {Gunther, Michael},
  keyword      = {Smithian Growth,Institutions,Maritime,China,South East Asia,Proximity,Shipbuilding,Navigation,Asian Mediterranean,pre-modern},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The Chinese Maritime Frontier: 10th — 16th Century},
  year         = {2015},
}