Advanced

Technology Intensive and Sustainable Schools: A Discourse Analysis of Statements regarding the Use of ICT in Education in Lund

Lindahl, Julia LU (2015) HEKM50 20152
Human Ecology
Abstract
This thesis investigates the perceptions of people within the education sector in Lund Municipality regarding sustainability implications of the use of information and communications technology (ICT) in schools. It demonstrates how local perceptions are largely affected by powerful global neoliberal forces.
The study is based on a critical discourse analysis of policy documents and interviews with municipal employees. Technology is regarded as a social, cultural and political phenomenon. The theoretical framework of the study is based on the idea of technology fetishism and the five capitals model of sustainability. In the analysis of the empirical material, the CDA approach of N. Fairclough was adopted.
The analysis shows that there is... (More)
This thesis investigates the perceptions of people within the education sector in Lund Municipality regarding sustainability implications of the use of information and communications technology (ICT) in schools. It demonstrates how local perceptions are largely affected by powerful global neoliberal forces.
The study is based on a critical discourse analysis of policy documents and interviews with municipal employees. Technology is regarded as a social, cultural and political phenomenon. The theoretical framework of the study is based on the idea of technology fetishism and the five capitals model of sustainability. In the analysis of the empirical material, the CDA approach of N. Fairclough was adopted.
The analysis shows that there is a discursive struggle between hegemonic neoliberal economic and digital society discourses, and a critical discourse. In addition, a number of sub-discourses appear in the texts. According to the findings, headmasters are mostly positive about the possibility of creating technology intensive and sustainable schools. The study reveals that local actions are affected by technology fetishistic ideals and the destructive relationship to natural capital that exist in today's industrialised society. Although individual schools cannot change the world order, they can serve as role models in the creation of technology intensive and sustainable schools through the promotion of learning, citizenship and equality. In so doing, they can minimise the reduction of natural capital as a result of the use of ICT, and contribute to the maintenance and enhancement of natural, human and social capital. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Lindahl, Julia LU
supervisor
organization
course
HEKM50 20152
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
ICT, schools, discourse, power, technology fetishism, the five capitals model of sustainability
language
English
id
8084549
date added to LUP
2015-11-06 13:41:00
date last changed
2015-11-06 13:41:00
@misc{8084549,
  abstract     = {This thesis investigates the perceptions of people within the education sector in Lund Municipality regarding sustainability implications of the use of information and communications technology (ICT) in schools. It demonstrates how local perceptions are largely affected by powerful global neoliberal forces.
The study is based on a critical discourse analysis of policy documents and interviews with municipal employees. Technology is regarded as a social, cultural and political phenomenon. The theoretical framework of the study is based on the idea of technology fetishism and the five capitals model of sustainability. In the analysis of the empirical material, the CDA approach of N. Fairclough was adopted. 
The analysis shows that there is a discursive struggle between hegemonic neoliberal economic and digital society discourses, and a critical discourse. In addition, a number of sub-discourses appear in the texts. According to the findings, headmasters are mostly positive about the possibility of creating technology intensive and sustainable schools. The study reveals that local actions are affected by technology fetishistic ideals and the destructive relationship to natural capital that exist in today's industrialised society. Although individual schools cannot change the world order, they can serve as role models in the creation of technology intensive and sustainable schools through the promotion of learning, citizenship and equality. In so doing, they can minimise the reduction of natural capital as a result of the use of ICT, and contribute to the maintenance and enhancement of natural, human and social capital.},
  author       = {Lindahl, Julia},
  keyword      = {ICT,schools,discourse,power,technology fetishism,the five capitals model of sustainability},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Technology Intensive and Sustainable Schools: A Discourse Analysis of Statements regarding the Use of ICT in Education in Lund},
  year         = {2015},
}