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Evaluation of FMI-based workflow for simulation and testing of industrial automation applications

Gunnarsson, Sara (2016) In MSc Theses
Department of Automatic Control
Abstract
The Modelica language is an object-oriented, equation-based language used for modeling and design in many different domains and for various physical applications. In order to exchange models both between Modelicabased tools and other tools the Functional Mock-up Interface (FMI) has emerged. This interface enables exchange of virtual models between manufacturers and/or divisions within a company. The industry is moving towards increased development of virtual models, both for understanding of systems but also because it lowers the development costs.

In this thesis a proof-of-concept of the newly released FMI support in Automation Studio is tested. With a physical model of a reaction wheel pendulum as base, a virtual model is designed in... (More)
The Modelica language is an object-oriented, equation-based language used for modeling and design in many different domains and for various physical applications. In order to exchange models both between Modelicabased tools and other tools the Functional Mock-up Interface (FMI) has emerged. This interface enables exchange of virtual models between manufacturers and/or divisions within a company. The industry is moving towards increased development of virtual models, both for understanding of systems but also because it lowers the development costs.

In this thesis a proof-of-concept of the newly released FMI support in Automation Studio is tested. With a physical model of a reaction wheel pendulum as base, a virtual model is designed in the Modelica-based simulation tool Dymola. A reaction wheel pendulum is a pendulum equipped with a motorized wheel, which is run in different directions in order to swing up the pendulum and to be able to balance it at its highest point. The Dymola model is converted into a Functional Mock-up Unit (FMU), which is the implementation of the FMI. Since not all values of the pendulum are known, an estimation script is written and run in JModelica.org. The FMU is then modified with these estimated values and tested with the controller included together with the reaction wheel pendulum in Simulink, in order to verify that these work together. Lastly the FMU is imported into Automation Studio together with the controller, imported with Automation Studio Target for Simulink, and simulated together there.

The workflow of the thesis was successful and the controller managed to control the FMU in Automation Studio. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Gunnarsson, Sara
supervisor
organization
year
type
H3 - Professional qualifications (4 Years - )
subject
publication/series
MSc Theses
report number
TFRT-6002
ISSN
0280-5316
language
English
id
8776878
date added to LUP
2016-02-28 16:48:46
date last changed
2016-02-28 16:48:46
@misc{8776878,
  abstract     = {The Modelica language is an object-oriented, equation-based language used for modeling and design in many different domains and for various physical applications. In order to exchange models both between Modelicabased tools and other tools the Functional Mock-up Interface (FMI) has emerged. This interface enables exchange of virtual models between manufacturers and/or divisions within a company. The industry is moving towards increased development of virtual models, both for understanding of systems but also because it lowers the development costs.

 In this thesis a proof-of-concept of the newly released FMI support in Automation Studio is tested. With a physical model of a reaction wheel pendulum as base, a virtual model is designed in the Modelica-based simulation tool Dymola. A reaction wheel pendulum is a pendulum equipped with a motorized wheel, which is run in different directions in order to swing up the pendulum and to be able to balance it at its highest point. The Dymola model is converted into a Functional Mock-up Unit (FMU), which is the implementation of the FMI. Since not all values of the pendulum are known, an estimation script is written and run in JModelica.org. The FMU is then modified with these estimated values and tested with the controller included together with the reaction wheel pendulum in Simulink, in order to verify that these work together. Lastly the FMU is imported into Automation Studio together with the controller, imported with Automation Studio Target for Simulink, and simulated together there.

 The workflow of the thesis was successful and the controller managed to control the FMU in Automation Studio.},
  author       = {Gunnarsson, Sara},
  issn         = {0280-5316},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {MSc Theses},
  title        = {Evaluation of FMI-based workflow for simulation and testing of industrial automation applications},
  year         = {2016},
}