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Mapping HIV in Uganda

Hollmann, Lara LU (2016) SGED10 20161
Department of Human Geography
Human Ecology
Abstract
Over the course of almost four decades the world has been left vulnerable by the HIV epidemic. Displaying the biggest public health challenge currently, many scholars aim to further the understanding of the mechanisms of the spread of HIV. This study aims to contribute to the existing body of literature through adding a spatial aspect to research performed on HIV key drivers in Uganda. Furthermore, the aim of this research is to explore the geographical aspects of the HIV epidemic on a district-level in Uganda in order to examine the relationship between the geographical distribution of HIV cases and their socioeconomic background. This was assessed using a quantitative cross-sectional study design relying on Multiple Linear Regression and... (More)
Over the course of almost four decades the world has been left vulnerable by the HIV epidemic. Displaying the biggest public health challenge currently, many scholars aim to further the understanding of the mechanisms of the spread of HIV. This study aims to contribute to the existing body of literature through adding a spatial aspect to research performed on HIV key drivers in Uganda. Furthermore, the aim of this research is to explore the geographical aspects of the HIV epidemic on a district-level in Uganda in order to examine the relationship between the geographical distribution of HIV cases and their socioeconomic background. This was assessed using a quantitative cross-sectional study design relying on Multiple Linear Regression and Geographically Weighted Regression analysis. The analysis was performed using SPSS and ArcGIS. Prior to this, the conceptual framework in the shape of a risk-chain framework led by the concept of vulnerability, identified seven socioeconomic factors based on a thorough literature review which were measured in eight variables. The study assessed that HIV and the identified socioeconomic factors have a global and stationary relationship which accounts for 26.1% of the variance in HIV rates. The variables for conflict, wealth, access to health care and gender equality were assessed to be statistically significant. However, this was not enough to create a properly specified statistical model, hence potential key factors which could improve the analysis were discussed. (Less)
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author
Hollmann, Lara LU
supervisor
organization
alternative title
A spatial analysis assessing the influence of socioeconomic factors on the spread of HIV on a district-level in the Republic of Uganda
course
SGED10 20161
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Multiple Linear Regression, HIV, Geographically Weighted Regression, Socioeconomics, Vulnerability
language
English
id
8873963
date added to LUP
2016-06-23 09:04:13
date last changed
2016-06-23 09:04:13
@misc{8873963,
  abstract     = {Over the course of almost four decades the world has been left vulnerable by the HIV epidemic. Displaying the biggest public health challenge currently, many scholars aim to further the understanding of the mechanisms of the spread of HIV. This study aims to contribute to the existing body of literature through adding a spatial aspect to research performed on HIV key drivers in Uganda. Furthermore, the aim of this research is to explore the geographical aspects of the HIV epidemic on a district-level in Uganda in order to examine the relationship between the geographical distribution of HIV cases and their socioeconomic background. This was assessed using a quantitative cross-sectional study design relying on Multiple Linear Regression and Geographically Weighted Regression analysis. The analysis was performed using SPSS and ArcGIS. Prior to this, the conceptual framework in the shape of a risk-chain framework led by the concept of vulnerability, identified seven socioeconomic factors based on a thorough literature review which were measured in eight variables. The study assessed that HIV and the identified socioeconomic factors have a global and stationary relationship which accounts for 26.1% of the variance in HIV rates. The variables for conflict, wealth, access to health care and gender equality were assessed to be statistically significant. However, this was not enough to create a properly specified statistical model, hence potential key factors which could improve the analysis were discussed.},
  author       = {Hollmann, Lara},
  keyword      = {Multiple Linear Regression,HIV,Geographically Weighted Regression,Socioeconomics,Vulnerability},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Mapping HIV in Uganda},
  year         = {2016},
}