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The Growing City

Almenius, Richard LU (2016) ASBM01 20161
Department of Architecture and the Built Environment
Abstract
London is a large city, yet it’s almost entirely dependent on food from outside the city. The city imports 80 percent of its food, and much of it from abroad. Food is being transported longer and longer distances and these food miles (from producer to consumer) comes with great concerns about local and global sustainability. Heavy road freight daily congests and pollute the inner city of London as well as the needs just get more for every day. The inner city people, and especially children, growing up in an urban environment loose the knowledge or never get it of from where and how crops grow.

London’s population is growing fast and vacant land is hard to find, therefore ineffective built up areas or brownfield land need to be... (More)
London is a large city, yet it’s almost entirely dependent on food from outside the city. The city imports 80 percent of its food, and much of it from abroad. Food is being transported longer and longer distances and these food miles (from producer to consumer) comes with great concerns about local and global sustainability. Heavy road freight daily congests and pollute the inner city of London as well as the needs just get more for every day. The inner city people, and especially children, growing up in an urban environment loose the knowledge or never get it of from where and how crops grow.

London’s population is growing fast and vacant land is hard to find, therefore ineffective built up areas or brownfield land need to be re-developed so the city can grow within it’s boarders. Greenwich peninsula, situated in south-east London, is today a scattered place with large brownfield areas and a motorway cutting the peninsula in two. However, it’s also home to the Millennium dome, close contact to the Thames river and with public transport as the underground. The thesis investigate how this land can be transformed into a lively neighbourhood that solves more than just London’s need for housing: Urban farming on rooftops and courtyards and a large scale food production in a converted former industrial building will work as a pilot project for a new sustainable way of living in London. The growing city will aim to be an including place with a strong community as well raise the general knowledge of how and what food comes from to Londoners mind. (Less)
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author
Almenius, Richard LU
supervisor
organization
alternative title
from brownfield towards a productive neighbourhood in south-east london
course
ASBM01 20161
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
urban planning, sustainable urban design, redevelopment area, brownfield, farming, urban farming, food miles, food supply chain, freight, housing, aquaponics, production, London, Greenwich Peninsula
language
English
id
8880085
date added to LUP
2016-07-04 11:18:51
date last changed
2016-07-04 11:18:51
@misc{8880085,
  abstract     = {London is a large city, yet it’s almost entirely dependent on food from outside the city. The city imports 80 percent of its food, and much of it from abroad. Food is being transported longer and longer distances and these food miles (from producer to consumer) comes with great concerns about local and global sustainability. Heavy road freight daily congests and pollute the inner city of London as well as the needs just get more for every day. The inner city people, and especially children, growing up in an urban environment loose the knowledge or never get it of from where and how crops grow.

London’s population is growing fast and vacant land is hard to find, therefore ineffective built up areas or brownfield land need to be re-developed so the city can grow within it’s boarders. Greenwich peninsula, situated in south-east London, is today a scattered place with large brownfield areas and a motorway cutting the peninsula in two. However, it’s also home to the Millennium dome, close contact to the Thames river and with public transport as the underground. The thesis investigate how this land can be transformed into a lively neighbourhood that solves more than just London’s need for housing: Urban farming on rooftops and courtyards and a large scale food production in a converted former industrial building will work as a pilot project for a new sustainable way of living in London. The growing city will aim to be an including place with a strong community as well raise the general knowledge of how and what food comes from to Londoners mind.},
  author       = {Almenius, Richard},
  keyword      = {urban planning,sustainable urban design,redevelopment area,brownfield,farming,urban farming,food miles,food supply chain,freight,housing,aquaponics,production,London,Greenwich Peninsula},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The Growing City},
  year         = {2016},
}