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The state, the curriculum and the nation

Rajala, Otso Artturi LU (2016) UTVK03 20161
Sociology
Abstract
The Republic of Rwanda has traditionally been a home to three ethnic groups: Hutus, Tutsis and Twas. Clear divides between the groups have been created over the centuries by both inside and outside forces. Each group shares among themselves a collective identity which can be used to rally masses to create tensions in society. This is a development a stability-pursuing state seeks to avoid. In the past, tensions stemming from ethnic divides have resulted in atrocities in Rwanda, last time during the war and the genocide in 1990-1994. In the aftermath of the genocide, the Rwandan state adopted a ‘never again’ mentality towards domestic conflicts.

This thesis argues two points: First, the Rwandan state is actively working to eliminate... (More)
The Republic of Rwanda has traditionally been a home to three ethnic groups: Hutus, Tutsis and Twas. Clear divides between the groups have been created over the centuries by both inside and outside forces. Each group shares among themselves a collective identity which can be used to rally masses to create tensions in society. This is a development a stability-pursuing state seeks to avoid. In the past, tensions stemming from ethnic divides have resulted in atrocities in Rwanda, last time during the war and the genocide in 1990-1994. In the aftermath of the genocide, the Rwandan state adopted a ‘never again’ mentality towards domestic conflicts.

This thesis argues two points: First, the Rwandan state is actively working to eliminate domestic ethnic identities as a part of a nation-building project. To build this argument, the thesis explores the historical background of the environment where the identities exist, the role of ideology, and solidarity as a binding force in the Rwandan society.

The second argument is that the Rwandan state utilises the national curriculum to diffuse the new national identity into the pupils. To back this argument, the thesis presents the national curriculum as a platform where state goals are realised. Using qualitative content analysis methods and synthesising material from different sources, this thesis seeks to confirm the arguments by studying the context where the Rwandan national curriculum is drafted and how national identity diffusion becomes apparent in it. (Less)
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author
Rajala, Otso Artturi LU
supervisor
organization
alternative title
A qualitative study of national identity diffusion through the national curriculum in the Republic of Rwanda
course
UTVK03 20161
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Rwanda, nation-building, national identity, authoritarianism, curriculum, school-society nexus
language
English
id
8881566
date added to LUP
2016-10-27 16:19:12
date last changed
2016-10-27 16:19:12
@misc{8881566,
  abstract     = {The Republic of Rwanda has traditionally been a home to three ethnic groups: Hutus, Tutsis and Twas. Clear divides between the groups have been created over the centuries by both inside and outside forces. Each group shares among themselves a collective identity which can be used to rally masses to create tensions in society. This is a development a stability-pursuing state seeks to avoid. In the past, tensions stemming from ethnic divides have resulted in atrocities in Rwanda, last time during the war and the genocide in 1990-1994. In the aftermath of the genocide, the Rwandan state adopted a ‘never again’ mentality towards domestic conflicts.

This thesis argues two points: First, the Rwandan state is actively working to eliminate domestic ethnic identities as a part of a nation-building project. To build this argument, the thesis explores the historical background of the environment where the identities exist, the role of ideology, and solidarity as a binding force in the Rwandan society.

The second argument is that the Rwandan state utilises the national curriculum to diffuse the new national identity into the pupils. To back this argument, the thesis presents the national curriculum as a platform where state goals are realised. Using qualitative content analysis methods and synthesising material from different sources, this thesis seeks to confirm the arguments by studying the context where the Rwandan national curriculum is drafted and how national identity diffusion becomes apparent in it.},
  author       = {Rajala, Otso Artturi},
  keyword      = {Rwanda,nation-building,national identity,authoritarianism,curriculum,school-society nexus},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The state, the curriculum and the nation},
  year         = {2016},
}