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Proactive mnemonic control to reduce memory interference

Kerrén, Casper LU (2016) PSYP01 20161
Department of Psychology
Abstract
With behavioural and electrophysiological data from 24 participants, the goal of the present study was to advance the understanding of memory interference and how it is resolved by cognitive control of memory. Previous work has shown that a retrieval cue can be processed in a goal-directed manner and that beforehand knowing what to expect further can facilitate the processing and thereby reduce interference. According to the dual-mechanism of control (DMC) framework, proactive and reactive control are cognitive control mechanisms that can be recruited to detect and resolve conflicts. Reactive control is recruited when the conflict arises whereas proactive control can be employed when the upcoming conflict is expected. The primary aim was... (More)
With behavioural and electrophysiological data from 24 participants, the goal of the present study was to advance the understanding of memory interference and how it is resolved by cognitive control of memory. Previous work has shown that a retrieval cue can be processed in a goal-directed manner and that beforehand knowing what to expect further can facilitate the processing and thereby reduce interference. According to the dual-mechanism of control (DMC) framework, proactive and reactive control are cognitive control mechanisms that can be recruited to detect and resolve conflicts. Reactive control is recruited when the conflict arises whereas proactive control can be employed when the upcoming conflict is expected. The primary aim was to test the two control modes together with a retrieval-practice paradigm, known to induce interference and investigate whether proactive control could reduce the amount of interference, which consequentially would minimize forgetting. To our knowledge, this is the first study that relates proactive cognitive control of memory and a retrieval-practice paradigm. Our electrophysiological results were partially in line with earlier studies showing reduced negativity for memory retrieval during high interference, but did not find any significant differences between proactive and reactive control. In contrast, behavioural results showed a trend towards that proactively control memory interference leads to less retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF). Methodological drawbacks of the present experiment are discussed, as well as implications and suggestions for future studies. (Less)
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author
Kerrén, Casper LU
supervisor
organization
course
PSYP01 20161
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
retrieval-induced forgetting, electroencephalography, event-related potentials, cognitive control, memory interference, dual-mechanism of control (DMC) framework, proactive control, reactive control
language
English
id
8890244
date added to LUP
2016-09-13 16:01:11
date last changed
2016-09-13 16:01:11
@misc{8890244,
  abstract     = {With behavioural and electrophysiological data from 24 participants, the goal of the present study was to advance the understanding of memory interference and how it is resolved by cognitive control of memory. Previous work has shown that a retrieval cue can be processed in a goal-directed manner and that beforehand knowing what to expect further can facilitate the processing and thereby reduce interference. According to the dual-mechanism of control (DMC) framework, proactive and reactive control are cognitive control mechanisms that can be recruited to detect and resolve conflicts. Reactive control is recruited when the conflict arises whereas proactive control can be employed when the upcoming conflict is expected. The primary aim was to test the two control modes together with a retrieval-practice paradigm, known to induce interference and investigate whether proactive control could reduce the amount of interference, which consequentially would minimize forgetting. To our knowledge, this is the first study that relates proactive cognitive control of memory and a retrieval-practice paradigm. Our electrophysiological results were partially in line with earlier studies showing reduced negativity for memory retrieval during high interference, but did not find any significant differences between proactive and reactive control. In contrast, behavioural results showed a trend towards that proactively control memory interference leads to less retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF). Methodological drawbacks of the present experiment are discussed, as well as implications and suggestions for future studies.},
  author       = {Kerrén, Casper},
  keyword      = {retrieval-induced forgetting,electroencephalography,event-related potentials,cognitive control,memory interference,dual-mechanism of control (DMC) framework,proactive control,reactive control},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Proactive mnemonic control to reduce memory interference},
  year         = {2016},
}