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Mega-mining extractivism and social resistance in Argentina. Women’s motivations to mobilize.

Rolando, Camila LU (2016) HEKM50 20161
Department of Human Geography
Human Ecology
Abstract
Mega-mining extractivism is recent in Argentina. The expansion of the sector strengthened the opposition of towns which formed self-summoned neighbors’ assemblies. Women are outstanding members of these assemblies. The anti-colonialist and anti-capitalist ecofeminism of Mies and Shiva is combined with the literature on environmental justice for a feminist political ecology study of the anti-mining movement in Argentina and the mayor presence of women. This thesis is firstly concerned with presenting the governmental pro-mining policies endorsed since the early 1990s and the contrarian social dynamic of the neighbors’ assemblies. To do so, the existing literature is revisited and put together with the analysis of the mining conflicts mapped... (More)
Mega-mining extractivism is recent in Argentina. The expansion of the sector strengthened the opposition of towns which formed self-summoned neighbors’ assemblies. Women are outstanding members of these assemblies. The anti-colonialist and anti-capitalist ecofeminism of Mies and Shiva is combined with the literature on environmental justice for a feminist political ecology study of the anti-mining movement in Argentina and the mayor presence of women. This thesis is firstly concerned with presenting the governmental pro-mining policies endorsed since the early 1990s and the contrarian social dynamic of the neighbors’ assemblies. To do so, the existing literature is revisited and put together with the analysis of the mining conflicts mapped out on the Environmental Justice atlas. In a second step, this research focuses on the reasons for women to mobilize against mega-mining. Previous literature has overly focused on motherhood to explain women’s incentives to advocate for environmental justice. Here, qualitative data were collected through Skype interviews with women who are members of assemblies which have mobilize before the mine companies’ implementation. The referents expressed their motivations to preventively oppose mining which combine the defense and the attachment to the territory with their concerns as mothers and with the knowledge they obtained about the mines’ impacts. By going further than motherhood to understand women’s motivations, the patriarchal binarism which exclusively situates women in the private sphere can be better avoided. (Less)
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author
Rolando, Camila LU
supervisor
organization
course
HEKM50 20161
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
territoriality, motherhood, women, ecofeminism, environmental justice
language
English
id
8892155
date added to LUP
2017-05-22 14:24:54
date last changed
2017-05-22 14:24:54
@misc{8892155,
  abstract     = {Mega-mining extractivism is recent in Argentina. The expansion of the sector strengthened the opposition of towns which formed self-summoned neighbors’ assemblies. Women are outstanding members of these assemblies. The anti-colonialist and anti-capitalist ecofeminism of Mies and Shiva is combined with the literature on environmental justice for a feminist political ecology study of the anti-mining movement in Argentina and the mayor presence of women. This thesis is firstly concerned with presenting the governmental pro-mining policies endorsed since the early 1990s and the contrarian social dynamic of the neighbors’ assemblies. To do so, the existing literature is revisited and put together with the analysis of the mining conflicts mapped out on the Environmental Justice atlas. In a second step, this research focuses on the reasons for women to mobilize against mega-mining. Previous literature has overly focused on motherhood to explain women’s incentives to advocate for environmental justice. Here, qualitative data were collected through Skype interviews with women who are members of assemblies which have mobilize before the mine companies’ implementation. The referents expressed their motivations to preventively oppose mining which combine the defense and the attachment to the territory with their concerns as mothers and with the knowledge they obtained about the mines’ impacts. By going further than motherhood to understand women’s motivations, the patriarchal binarism which exclusively situates women in the private sphere can be better avoided.},
  author       = {Rolando, Camila},
  keyword      = {territoriality,motherhood,women,ecofeminism,environmental justice},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Mega-mining extractivism and social resistance in Argentina. Women’s motivations to mobilize.},
  year         = {2016},
}