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Women’s Differentiated Vulnerability Regarding Climate Change and Adaptation - A qualitative case study on how perception, agency and resources determine women’s adaptive capacity and well-being outcomes in rural Fiji

Loew, Dana Julia LU (2017) MIDM19 20171
Department of Human Geography
LUMID International Master programme in applied International Development and Management
Abstract
The purpose of this thesis is to explore the relationship between gendered vulnerabilities and well-being outcomes in the face of climate change by introducing a consolidated gender and vulnerability framework as a tool to highlight and assess underlying power structures determining women’s adaptive capacity. The thesis first focuses on women’s perception of climate signals and its direct and indirect impacts, as perception is argued to be a facilitating or constraining factor to adaptive decision-making. It then seeks to demonstrate how agency in the form of decision-making power and gendered responsibilities, and resources in the form of biophysical characteristics, social resources, financial resources and information and the media,... (More)
The purpose of this thesis is to explore the relationship between gendered vulnerabilities and well-being outcomes in the face of climate change by introducing a consolidated gender and vulnerability framework as a tool to highlight and assess underlying power structures determining women’s adaptive capacity. The thesis first focuses on women’s perception of climate signals and its direct and indirect impacts, as perception is argued to be a facilitating or constraining factor to adaptive decision-making. It then seeks to demonstrate how agency in the form of decision-making power and gendered responsibilities, and resources in the form of biophysical characteristics, social resources, financial resources and information and the media, combine to create the adaptation arena defining the opportunities available to individuals and groups. As such, the thesis seeks to demonstrate not only how the physical, but also the social vulnerability context determines the well-being outcomes such as meeting basic needs, livelihood sustainability and the degree of time poverty. It does so with the aim to produce a case study on differentiated vulnerability that does not understand women’s vulnerability as intrinsic, but rather focuses on the intersecting and context-specific power structures that produce vulnerability in the first place. (Less)
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author
Loew, Dana Julia LU
supervisor
organization
course
MIDM19 20171
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
adaptation, adaptive capacity, climate change, decision-making, empowerment, gender, livelihood, power structures, vulnerability.
language
English
id
8906693
date added to LUP
2018-03-09 10:28:51
date last changed
2018-03-09 10:28:51
@misc{8906693,
  abstract     = {The purpose of this thesis is to explore the relationship between gendered vulnerabilities and well-being outcomes in the face of climate change by introducing a consolidated gender and vulnerability framework as a tool to highlight and assess underlying power structures determining women’s adaptive capacity. The thesis first focuses on women’s perception of climate signals and its direct and indirect impacts, as perception is argued to be a facilitating or constraining factor to adaptive decision-making. It then seeks to demonstrate how agency in the form of decision-making power and gendered responsibilities, and resources in the form of biophysical characteristics, social resources, financial resources and information and the media, combine to create the adaptation arena defining the opportunities available to individuals and groups. As such, the thesis seeks to demonstrate not only how the physical, but also the social vulnerability context determines the well-being outcomes such as meeting basic needs, livelihood sustainability and the degree of time poverty. It does so with the aim to produce a case study on differentiated vulnerability that does not understand women’s vulnerability as intrinsic, but rather focuses on the intersecting and context-specific power structures that produce vulnerability in the first place.},
  author       = {Loew, Dana Julia},
  keyword      = {adaptation,adaptive capacity,climate change,decision-making,empowerment,gender,livelihood,power structures,vulnerability.},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Women’s Differentiated Vulnerability Regarding Climate Change and Adaptation - A qualitative case study on how perception, agency and resources determine women’s adaptive capacity and well-being outcomes in rural Fiji},
  year         = {2017},
}