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The Yemeni War-to-Violence Transition

Bergander, Rasmus LU (2017) FKVK02 20171
Department of Political Science
Abstract
In November 2011, at the brink of state failure the United Nations and the Gulf Cooperation Council brokered a deal with the Yemeni government for the implementation of a democratic transition towards peace. The Yemeni people, tired of the authoritarian regime of Ali Abdullah Saleh greeted the initiative and the opportunity of finally getting to shape the Yemeni state in their favor. But even though the transition had a promising design and was regarded as one of the most inclusive processes of peacebuilding ever performed, the transition failed and during its implementation violence in Yemen increased rapidly. This thesis tries to explain this contradictory development by tracking implications for causal mechanism in three processes: the... (More)
In November 2011, at the brink of state failure the United Nations and the Gulf Cooperation Council brokered a deal with the Yemeni government for the implementation of a democratic transition towards peace. The Yemeni people, tired of the authoritarian regime of Ali Abdullah Saleh greeted the initiative and the opportunity of finally getting to shape the Yemeni state in their favor. But even though the transition had a promising design and was regarded as one of the most inclusive processes of peacebuilding ever performed, the transition failed and during its implementation violence in Yemen increased rapidly. This thesis tries to explain this contradictory development by tracking implications for causal mechanism in three processes: the National Dialogue Conference, the Election and the Security Sector Reform. The analysis concludes that the process of the National Dialogue Conference failed in delivering results to the Yemeni people, creating a rift between transitional politics and the situation on the ground. Therefore, this process is viewed as the major causal mechanism for the increased violence. Overall the interaction of all three processes jointly contributed to the violent development making this study a prof on how hard it is to implement democracy on war-torn societies without risking making the situation even worse. (Less)
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author
Bergander, Rasmus LU
supervisor
organization
alternative title
An explanatory case study of the Yemeni war-to-democracy transition in connection to violence
course
FKVK02 20171
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
War-to-democracy transition, Violence, Process, Yemen, Political Space, Elections, Security Sector Reform, National Dialogue Conference, Mechanism, Process-tracing, Reforms, Democracy
language
English
id
8909256
date added to LUP
2017-07-11 17:44:47
date last changed
2017-07-11 17:59:38
@misc{8909256,
  abstract     = {In November 2011, at the brink of state failure the United Nations and the Gulf Cooperation Council brokered a deal with the Yemeni government for the implementation of a democratic transition towards peace. The Yemeni people, tired of the authoritarian regime of Ali Abdullah Saleh greeted the initiative and the opportunity of finally getting to shape the Yemeni state in their favor. But even though the transition had a promising design and was regarded as one of the most inclusive processes of peacebuilding ever performed, the transition failed and during its implementation violence in Yemen increased rapidly. This thesis tries to explain this contradictory development by tracking implications for causal mechanism in three processes: the National Dialogue Conference, the Election and the Security Sector Reform. The analysis concludes that the process of the National Dialogue Conference failed in delivering results to the Yemeni people, creating a rift between transitional politics and the situation on the ground. Therefore, this process is viewed as the major causal mechanism for the increased violence. Overall the interaction of all three processes jointly contributed to the violent development making this study a prof on how hard it is to implement democracy on war-torn societies without risking making the situation even worse.},
  author       = {Bergander, Rasmus},
  keyword      = {War-to-democracy transition,Violence,Process,Yemen,Political Space,Elections,Security Sector Reform,National Dialogue Conference,Mechanism,Process-tracing,Reforms,Democracy},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The Yemeni War-to-Violence Transition},
  year         = {2017},
}