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Predictive Value of Olfaction, α-synuclein and β-amyloid on Cognition in Parkinson’s Disease

Hrast, Barbara LU (2017) PSYP01 20171
Department of Psychology
Abstract
Cognitive decline and subsequent dementia are known to be prevalent in PD (Parkinson’s disease) however, recently olfactory deficits have been found to be present in the majority of PD patients. Findings indicate that they precede the motor symptoms and could therefore be used as early clinical markers for PD. The purpose of this study was to investigate the predictive value of olfaction and CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) biomarkers on cognitive decline in patients with PD. The data used in this study was collected within the longitudinal Swedish BioFINDER study. The growth curve modelling included 204 patients with PD and PDD (Parkinson’s disease dementia). Cognitive measures for global cognition, delayed memory, executive function, and... (More)
Cognitive decline and subsequent dementia are known to be prevalent in PD (Parkinson’s disease) however, recently olfactory deficits have been found to be present in the majority of PD patients. Findings indicate that they precede the motor symptoms and could therefore be used as early clinical markers for PD. The purpose of this study was to investigate the predictive value of olfaction and CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) biomarkers on cognitive decline in patients with PD. The data used in this study was collected within the longitudinal Swedish BioFINDER study. The growth curve modelling included 204 patients with PD and PDD (Parkinson’s disease dementia). Cognitive measures for global cognition, delayed memory, executive function, and cognitive speed were used to model the trajectory over the span of 6 years. Then, baseline demographic measures (age, sex, disease duration, Hoehn and Yahr staging scale), olfaction, and CSF biomarkers alpha-synuclein (αSyn) and β-amyloid 1-42 (Aβ42) were put into the multiple regression to predict cognitive outcomes. Worse baseline olfaction predicted worse cognitive outcomes for all four cognitive measures. In addition to worse baseline olfaction, lower levels of baseline Aβ42 predicted worse delayed memory. Surprisingly, αSyn did not show any predictive value. This study replicated some of the previous findings that showed the predictive value of olfaction and Aβ42 on cognitive decline in PD. The growth curve modelling corroborated previous and current results and established the connection between cognitive decline and olfaction. (Less)
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author
Hrast, Barbara LU
supervisor
organization
course
PSYP01 20171
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Parkinson’s disease, olfaction, cognition, cerebrospinal fluid, biomarkers, growth curve model
language
English
id
8917132
date added to LUP
2017-06-20 08:44:58
date last changed
2017-06-20 08:44:58
@misc{8917132,
  abstract     = {Cognitive decline and subsequent dementia are known to be prevalent in PD (Parkinson’s disease) however, recently olfactory deficits have been found to be present in the majority of PD patients. Findings indicate that they precede the motor symptoms and could therefore be used as early clinical markers for PD. The purpose of this study was to investigate the predictive value of olfaction and CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) biomarkers on cognitive decline in patients with PD. The data used in this study was collected within the longitudinal Swedish BioFINDER study. The growth curve modelling included 204 patients with PD and PDD (Parkinson’s disease dementia). Cognitive measures for global cognition, delayed memory, executive function, and cognitive speed were used to model the trajectory over the span of 6 years. Then, baseline demographic measures (age, sex, disease duration, Hoehn and Yahr staging scale), olfaction, and CSF biomarkers alpha-synuclein (αSyn) and β-amyloid 1-42 (Aβ42) were put into the multiple regression to predict cognitive outcomes. Worse baseline olfaction predicted worse cognitive outcomes for all four cognitive measures. In addition to worse baseline olfaction, lower levels of baseline Aβ42 predicted worse delayed memory. Surprisingly, αSyn did not show any predictive value. This study replicated some of the previous findings that showed the predictive value of olfaction and Aβ42 on cognitive decline in PD. The growth curve modelling corroborated previous and current results and established the connection between cognitive decline and olfaction.},
  author       = {Hrast, Barbara},
  keyword      = {Parkinson’s disease,olfaction,cognition,cerebrospinal fluid,biomarkers,growth curve model},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Predictive Value of Olfaction, α-synuclein and β-amyloid on Cognition in Parkinson’s Disease},
  year         = {2017},
}