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Aegis - Architectural Solution for Community and Critical Facility Resilience

Schulze, Sabrina LU (2017) AAHM10 20171
Department of Architecture and the Built Environment
Abstract
There is a lot of discussion going on how to adapt to the changing climatic
conditions, especially in countries where financial resources are limited.
The built environment has been identified as a key area of intervention. As
disasters, such as typhoons, can devastate entire cities, it is essential that
the most important buildings in these cities, the lifelines so to speak, are
resilient and can withstand major hazards.
The aim of this thesis is to show ways architecture can help to create
disaster resilient communities with a focus on critical facilities. Specifically,
as an example, a school and a health facility for a neighborhood in the
Philippines, one of the most disaster-prone countries of the world, will be
developed.... (More)
There is a lot of discussion going on how to adapt to the changing climatic
conditions, especially in countries where financial resources are limited.
The built environment has been identified as a key area of intervention. As
disasters, such as typhoons, can devastate entire cities, it is essential that
the most important buildings in these cities, the lifelines so to speak, are
resilient and can withstand major hazards.
The aim of this thesis is to show ways architecture can help to create
disaster resilient communities with a focus on critical facilities. Specifically,
as an example, a school and a health facility for a neighborhood in the
Philippines, one of the most disaster-prone countries of the world, will be
developed. Humanitarian architecture has been focusing a lot on disaster relief by
building temporary structures for shelter after a disaster. Although these
structures are needed, they are no long-term solution. It has to be ensured
that affected people can return to their old lives and homes. Moreover,
a lot of disaster resilient architecture is developed for the wealthy with
expensive materials and building methods. This thesis challenges these
common practices, by offering a different entry point for architecture in
disaster prone areas. It proposes disaster resilient architecture made from
local, cheap materials to make it accessible for communities in poorer
areas of the world. The disaster-type of concern is hydro-meteorological
disasters. The study site serves as an example, where such architecture
could be located. The thesis however also aims at creating generalizable
findings which can be applied to other sites, as well. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Schulze, Sabrina LU
supervisor
organization
course
AAHM10 20171
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
language
English
id
8918789
date added to LUP
2017-12-11 14:50:00
date last changed
2017-12-11 14:50:00
@misc{8918789,
  abstract     = {There is a lot of discussion going on how to adapt to the changing climatic
conditions, especially in countries where financial resources are limited.
The built environment has been identified as a key area of intervention. As
disasters, such as typhoons, can devastate entire cities, it is essential that
the most important buildings in these cities, the lifelines so to speak, are
resilient and can withstand major hazards.
The aim of this thesis is to show ways architecture can help to create
disaster resilient communities with a focus on critical facilities. Specifically,
as an example, a school and a health facility for a neighborhood in the
Philippines, one of the most disaster-prone countries of the world, will be
developed. Humanitarian architecture has been focusing a lot on disaster relief by
building temporary structures for shelter after a disaster. Although these
structures are needed, they are no long-term solution. It has to be ensured
that affected people can return to their old lives and homes. Moreover,
a lot of disaster resilient architecture is developed for the wealthy with
expensive materials and building methods. This thesis challenges these
common practices, by offering a different entry point for architecture in
disaster prone areas. It proposes disaster resilient architecture made from
local, cheap materials to make it accessible for communities in poorer
areas of the world. The disaster-type of concern is hydro-meteorological
disasters. The study site serves as an example, where such architecture
could be located. The thesis however also aims at creating generalizable
findings which can be applied to other sites, as well.},
  author       = {Schulze, Sabrina},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Aegis - Architectural Solution for Community and Critical Facility Resilience},
  year         = {2017},
}