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Fighting abundance : food waste opponents use of social media

Scheller, Christin LU (2017) MKVM13 20171
Media and Communication Studies
Abstract
As the general concern about the environment grows citizens find new ways to engage in practices that try to counter unsustainable practices. Often these practices are off the beaten political path and stand for newer methods to effectuate change on small or larger scales. This thesis looks at one of the newer forms of engagement, namely at individuals in anti food waste groups on the social network facebook. The qualitative study of 12 anti food waste practitioners provides insights on how people use the groups for information, organization or socialising purposes and how these groups influence their offline engagement.

Anti food waste practitioners show to have strong values and form communities in the online space. These in return... (More)
As the general concern about the environment grows citizens find new ways to engage in practices that try to counter unsustainable practices. Often these practices are off the beaten political path and stand for newer methods to effectuate change on small or larger scales. This thesis looks at one of the newer forms of engagement, namely at individuals in anti food waste groups on the social network facebook. The qualitative study of 12 anti food waste practitioners provides insights on how people use the groups for information, organization or socialising purposes and how these groups influence their offline engagement.

Anti food waste practitioners show to have strong values and form communities in the online space. These in return can provide confirmation and a network of likeminded people, which likely strengthens their identity as food waste practitioners. Looking through the lense of civic components influencing engagement and participation, helped to identify the basic requirements that are met by these practitioners to pursue and actively become involved or stay in the online realm.

The usefulness of online engagement is alleged to be tricky, often serving as a stage for self-presentation and  ineffective to transgress from the online dimension to the offline. However new forms like blogs and social media groups lead to a questioning of how engagement and participation are defined and lead to a reconfiguration inviting newer emerging forms. Engaged practitioners showed to successfully make use of the online groups to organize, amplify messages or attract new members, ultimately serving their offline needs. Other practitioners engage in groups and nourish a sense of community online, using the group as source of information and corroboration, which encourages them to  raise awareness online. (Less)
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author
Scheller, Christin LU
supervisor
organization
course
MKVM13 20171
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
food waste, online use, engagement, civic culteres, identity
language
English
id
8922768
date added to LUP
2017-09-07 11:40:06
date last changed
2017-09-07 11:40:06
@misc{8922768,
  abstract     = {As the general concern about the environment grows citizens find new ways to engage in practices that try to counter unsustainable practices. Often these practices are off the beaten political path and stand for newer methods to effectuate change on small or larger scales. This thesis looks at one of the newer forms of engagement, namely at individuals in anti food waste groups on the social network facebook. The qualitative study of 12 anti food waste practitioners provides insights on how people use the groups for information, organization or socialising purposes and how these groups influence their offline engagement. 

Anti food waste practitioners show to have strong values and form communities in the online space. These in return can provide confirmation and a network of likeminded people, which likely strengthens their identity as food waste practitioners. Looking through the lense of civic components influencing engagement and participation, helped to identify the basic requirements that are met by these practitioners to pursue and actively become involved or stay in the online realm.

The usefulness of online engagement is alleged to be tricky, often serving as a stage for self-presentation and  ineffective to transgress from the online dimension to the offline. However new forms like blogs and social media groups lead to a questioning of how engagement and participation are defined and lead to a reconfiguration inviting newer emerging forms. Engaged practitioners showed to successfully make use of the online groups to organize, amplify messages or attract new members, ultimately serving their offline needs. Other practitioners engage in groups and nourish a sense of community online, using the group as source of information and corroboration, which encourages them to  raise awareness online.},
  author       = {Scheller, Christin},
  keyword      = {food waste,online use,engagement,civic culteres,identity},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Fighting abundance : food waste opponents use of social media},
  year         = {2017},
}