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Can the Clean Development Mechanism bring Community Co-benefits? A case study of the Kachung Forest Project, Uganda

Edstedt, Karin LU (2017) SGED10 20171
Department of Human Geography
Human Ecology
Abstract
Global warming is one of the greatest challenges of our time. To globally reduce green house gas emissions, the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) was created under the Kyoto Protocol. The mechanism allows industrialized nations in the Global North to meet their emission reduction targets under the Kyoto protocol, by purchasing carbon credits generated from CDM projects implemented in developing countries. CDM projects are to contribute to local sustainable development in the host country. This research explores the impacts of a CDM afforestation project to local communities in Uganda. As use rights to land and resources for surrounding communities have been altered, the research aims to study to what extent the project has achieved... (More)
Global warming is one of the greatest challenges of our time. To globally reduce green house gas emissions, the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) was created under the Kyoto Protocol. The mechanism allows industrialized nations in the Global North to meet their emission reduction targets under the Kyoto protocol, by purchasing carbon credits generated from CDM projects implemented in developing countries. CDM projects are to contribute to local sustainable development in the host country. This research explores the impacts of a CDM afforestation project to local communities in Uganda. As use rights to land and resources for surrounding communities have been altered, the research aims to study to what extent the project has achieved socio-economic development. A qualitative field study was carried out during ten weeks in Dokolo District, Uganda, consisting of semi-structured interviews and observations. To analyze the data, a livelihoods framework is used to define changes to local livelihoods. To discuss the wider implications of the project, the concepts of green grabbing and climate justice are used. Contrary to claims about socio-economic development and poverty alleviation, the study confirms that the project has increased the vulnerability of households and raised poverty levels. Severe implications for climate justice has been recognized, as this study concludes that the project has resulted in conflict and externalized costs of mitigating climate change to local communities in the Global South. (Less)
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author
Edstedt, Karin LU
supervisor
organization
course
SGED10 20171
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Climate change mitigation, CDM, afforestation, local livelihood implications, climate justice, Uganda
language
English
id
8924441
date added to LUP
2017-10-03 10:15:45
date last changed
2017-10-03 10:15:45
@misc{8924441,
  abstract     = {Global warming is one of the greatest challenges of our time. To globally reduce green house gas emissions, the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) was created under the Kyoto Protocol. The mechanism allows industrialized nations in the Global North to meet their emission reduction targets under the Kyoto protocol, by purchasing carbon credits generated from CDM projects implemented in developing countries. CDM projects are to contribute to local sustainable development in the host country. This research explores the impacts of a CDM afforestation project to local communities in Uganda. As use rights to land and resources for surrounding communities have been altered, the research aims to study to what extent the project has achieved socio-economic development. A qualitative field study was carried out during ten weeks in Dokolo District, Uganda, consisting of semi-structured interviews and observations. To analyze the data, a livelihoods framework is used to define changes to local livelihoods. To discuss the wider implications of the project, the concepts of green grabbing and climate justice are used. Contrary to claims about socio-economic development and poverty alleviation, the study confirms that the project has increased the vulnerability of households and raised poverty levels. Severe implications for climate justice has been recognized, as this study concludes that the project has resulted in conflict and externalized costs of mitigating climate change to local communities in the Global South.},
  author       = {Edstedt, Karin},
  keyword      = {Climate change mitigation,CDM,afforestation,local livelihood implications,climate justice,Uganda},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Can the Clean Development Mechanism bring Community Co-benefits? A case study of the Kachung Forest Project, Uganda},
  year         = {2017},
}