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Does repetition make perfect? Comparing scanpaths over repeated visual search to investigate how scanpath similarity evolves with experience

Weisener, Alicia LU (2017) PSYP01 20171
Department of Psychology
Abstract
Visual search efficiency improves with repeated exposure to the same search problem, yet the mechanisms behind these search efficiency gains remain unclear. Investigating how eye-movement sequences evolve over repeated viewings is fundamental for understanding how skilful search develops over time and its role in learning and gaining expertise. Scanpath theory holds that repeated displays are investigated sequentially and in the same manner that they were initially encoded. Yet, new evidence suggests that eye movement sequences are only partly repeated and adapt with task experience. Twenty-five participants performed a complex visual search task, during which they were connected to an eye tracker. The results confirmed that the... (More)
Visual search efficiency improves with repeated exposure to the same search problem, yet the mechanisms behind these search efficiency gains remain unclear. Investigating how eye-movement sequences evolve over repeated viewings is fundamental for understanding how skilful search develops over time and its role in learning and gaining expertise. Scanpath theory holds that repeated displays are investigated sequentially and in the same manner that they were initially encoded. Yet, new evidence suggests that eye movement sequences are only partly repeated and adapt with task experience. Twenty-five participants performed a complex visual search task, during which they were connected to an eye tracker. The results confirmed that the presentation of repeated scenes leads to performance gains in both behavioural (search time, accuracy) and eye movement measures (number of fixations, scanpath similarity). Overall, our findings support the basic idea of scanpath theory and reveal that scanpath similarity unfolds over repetitions. The results suggest that with experience, observers adapt a more optimal strategy regarding scanpath shape, length and fixation position. Further research should uncover the mechanisms behind scanpath adaption and formation in individuals. (Less)
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author
Weisener, Alicia LU
supervisor
organization
course
PSYP01 20171
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Visual Search Strategies, Scanpath Similarity, MultiMatch, Real-World Visual Search, Contextual Cueing
language
English
id
8929059
date added to LUP
2017-12-22 10:33:55
date last changed
2017-12-22 10:33:55
@misc{8929059,
  abstract     = {Visual search efficiency improves with repeated exposure to the same search problem, yet the mechanisms behind these search efficiency gains remain unclear. Investigating how eye-movement sequences evolve over repeated viewings is fundamental for understanding how skilful search develops over time and its role in learning and gaining expertise. Scanpath theory holds that repeated displays are investigated sequentially and in the same manner that they were initially encoded. Yet, new evidence suggests that eye movement sequences are only partly repeated and adapt with task experience. Twenty-five participants performed a complex visual search task, during which they were connected to an eye tracker. The results confirmed that the presentation of repeated scenes leads to performance gains in both behavioural (search time, accuracy) and eye movement measures (number of fixations, scanpath similarity). Overall, our findings support the basic idea of scanpath theory and reveal that scanpath similarity unfolds over repetitions. The results suggest that with experience, observers adapt a more optimal strategy regarding scanpath shape, length and fixation position. Further research should uncover the mechanisms behind scanpath adaption and formation in individuals.},
  author       = {Weisener, Alicia},
  keyword      = {Visual Search Strategies,Scanpath Similarity,MultiMatch,Real-World Visual Search,Contextual Cueing},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Does repetition make perfect? Comparing scanpaths over repeated visual search to investigate how scanpath similarity evolves with experience},
  year         = {2017},
}