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"Made in Jordan"? - En fallstudie av EU:s reglerande inflytande genom handel i Jordanien

Kristersson Wallner, Oskar LU (2017) STVK02 20172
Department of Political Science
Abstract
Conditionality clauses in EU trade agreements are widely criticised for their inefficacy in influencing companies’ production processes. While it is usually customary that companies that fail to comply to said clauses may still continue to export to the single market, the new 2016 trade agreement between the EU and Jordan has imposed stricter restrictions and forbids non-compliant companies to export to the EU. In light of this, this essay aims to analyse how rules on including Syrian refugees in production processes of companies in designated areas has impacted the deregulation of working permits in Jordan, especially in processes that have existing methods for identifying non-compliant companies, such as through certification. In this... (More)
Conditionality clauses in EU trade agreements are widely criticised for their inefficacy in influencing companies’ production processes. While it is usually customary that companies that fail to comply to said clauses may still continue to export to the single market, the new 2016 trade agreement between the EU and Jordan has imposed stricter restrictions and forbids non-compliant companies to export to the EU. In light of this, this essay aims to analyse how rules on including Syrian refugees in production processes of companies in designated areas has impacted the deregulation of working permits in Jordan, especially in processes that have existing methods for identifying non-compliant companies, such as through certification. In this study, I used theories of the EU as a regulative power, and a modified version of the California- and the Delaware-effect. My results suggest that there is a causal relation between the trade agreement and the deregulation of work permits in Jordan, both in anticipation to, but especially after the trade agreement came into effect, challenging previous conceptions that EU trade agreements have low influence on production processes. (Less)
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author
Kristersson Wallner, Oskar LU
supervisor
organization
course
STVK02 20172
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Conditionality, European Union, Trade, Regulation, Jordan, Syrian refugees, Production process
language
Swedish
id
8930974
date added to LUP
2018-08-24 09:12:39
date last changed
2018-08-24 09:12:39
@misc{8930974,
  abstract     = {Conditionality clauses in EU trade agreements are widely criticised for their inefficacy in influencing companies’ production processes. While it is usually customary that companies that fail to comply to said clauses may still continue to export to the single market, the new 2016 trade agreement between the EU and Jordan has imposed stricter restrictions and forbids non-compliant companies to export to the EU. In light of this, this essay aims to analyse how rules on including Syrian refugees in production processes of companies in designated areas has impacted the deregulation of working permits in Jordan, especially in processes that have existing methods for identifying non-compliant companies, such as through certification. In this study, I used theories of the EU as a regulative power, and a modified version of the California- and the Delaware-effect. My results suggest that there is a causal relation between the trade agreement and the deregulation of work permits in Jordan, both in anticipation to, but especially after the trade agreement came into effect, challenging previous conceptions that EU trade agreements have low influence on production processes.},
  author       = {Kristersson Wallner, Oskar},
  keyword      = {Conditionality,European Union,Trade,Regulation,Jordan,Syrian refugees,Production process},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {"Made in Jordan"? - En fallstudie av EU:s reglerande inflytande genom handel i Jordanien},
  year         = {2017},
}