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"They treat us like we are nobody!" A phenomenological study of female sex workers’ experiences in accessing public health care services in Central Malawi

Roos, Sarah LU (2018) MIDM19 20181
Department of Human Geography
LUMID International Master programme in applied International Development and Management
Abstract
Female sex workers in Malawi are exposed to multiple occupational health and safety risks. Despite the fact that FSWs are impacting the general public’s health status, health care access is limited due to different challenges. In order to identify the barriers and receive a deeper understanding of the experiences FSWs make when accessing health care and how these experiences impact the women’s agency and well-being, a phenomenological study was employed. Even though health care experiences for key populations have been researched in other countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, no comparable study has yet been conducted in Malawi. In this study, seven FSWs were interviewed on an individual basis and 4 FSWs in pairs. In addition, 9 FSWs... (More)
Female sex workers in Malawi are exposed to multiple occupational health and safety risks. Despite the fact that FSWs are impacting the general public’s health status, health care access is limited due to different challenges. In order to identify the barriers and receive a deeper understanding of the experiences FSWs make when accessing health care and how these experiences impact the women’s agency and well-being, a phenomenological study was employed. Even though health care experiences for key populations have been researched in other countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, no comparable study has yet been conducted in Malawi. In this study, seven FSWs were interviewed on an individual basis and 4 FSWs in pairs. In addition, 9 FSWs participated in two focus group discussions. Transcripts were analysed by identifying emerging and recurring themes that were specifically related to interactions with health services. Empirical findings include that generally, FSWs are facing hostility, stigmatization and discrimination from health care providers when accessing public health care in Malawi. These experiences constitute as barriers to health care access, besides various financial, structural and individual barriers. Furthermore, they aggravate FSWs’ agency due to an inhibited ability to control decisions and actions affecting their health, which eventually also negatively impact their well-being. (Less)
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author
Roos, Sarah LU
supervisor
organization
course
MIDM19 20181
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
phenomenology, sex work, prostitution, health care access, experiences, barriers, stigma, Malawi
language
English
id
8939561
date added to LUP
2018-09-03 11:16:10
date last changed
2018-09-03 11:16:10
@misc{8939561,
  abstract     = {Female sex workers in Malawi are exposed to multiple occupational health and safety risks. Despite the fact that FSWs are impacting the general public’s health status, health care access is limited due to different challenges. In order to identify the barriers and receive a deeper understanding of the experiences FSWs make when accessing health care and how these experiences impact the women’s agency and well-being, a phenomenological study was employed. Even though health care experiences for key populations have been researched in other countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, no comparable study has yet been conducted in Malawi. In this study, seven FSWs were interviewed on an individual basis and 4 FSWs in pairs. In addition, 9 FSWs participated in two focus group discussions. Transcripts were analysed by identifying emerging and recurring themes that were specifically related to interactions with health services. Empirical findings include that generally, FSWs are facing hostility, stigmatization and discrimination from health care providers when accessing public health care in Malawi. These experiences constitute as barriers to health care access, besides various financial, structural and individual barriers. Furthermore, they aggravate FSWs’ agency due to an inhibited ability to control decisions and actions affecting their health, which eventually also negatively impact their well-being.},
  author       = {Roos, Sarah},
  keyword      = {phenomenology,sex work,prostitution,health care access,experiences,barriers,stigma,Malawi},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {"They treat us like we are nobody!" A phenomenological study of female sex workers’ experiences in accessing public health care services in Central Malawi},
  year         = {2018},
}