Advanced

The Effect of Cognitive Workload on Shooting Performance and Quiet Eye Duration

Gunnarsson, Grímur LU (2018) PSYP02 20181
Department of Psychology
Abstract
This study explored the effect of cognitive workload on shooting performance and quiet eye duration (QED) using a Stroop based handgun-shooting task (Stroop shooting). Furthermore, the difference between the reverse Stroop effect and the traditional Stroop effect when shooting based on the Attentional Control Theory was assessed. The methods used were partially based on previously published research by Wood, Vine, and Wilson (2016). Ten experienced shooters went through three shooting conditions (baseline shooting, traditional Stroop shooting, and reverse Stroop shooting) while equipped with eye tracking glasses to record eye movement. One-way ANOVA with repeated measures showed that the mean shooting performance was the best in the... (More)
This study explored the effect of cognitive workload on shooting performance and quiet eye duration (QED) using a Stroop based handgun-shooting task (Stroop shooting). Furthermore, the difference between the reverse Stroop effect and the traditional Stroop effect when shooting based on the Attentional Control Theory was assessed. The methods used were partially based on previously published research by Wood, Vine, and Wilson (2016). Ten experienced shooters went through three shooting conditions (baseline shooting, traditional Stroop shooting, and reverse Stroop shooting) while equipped with eye tracking glasses to record eye movement. One-way ANOVA with repeated measures showed that the mean shooting performance was the best in the baseline condition as well as it yielded the longest QED compared to both experimental conditions. No significant difference was found between reverse Stroop shooting and traditional Stroop shooting. The study provides insights in how the Stroop task and eye tracking can be used to assess shooting performance and quiet eye duration in controlled laboratory setting. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Gunnarsson, Grímur LU
supervisor
organization
course
PSYP02 20181
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
quiet eye, quiet eye duration, shooting performance, Stroop task, cognitive workload
language
English
id
8944196
date added to LUP
2018-06-04 13:07:02
date last changed
2018-06-04 13:07:02
@misc{8944196,
  abstract     = {This study explored the effect of cognitive workload on shooting performance and quiet eye duration (QED) using a Stroop based handgun-shooting task (Stroop shooting). Furthermore, the difference between the reverse Stroop effect and the traditional Stroop effect when shooting based on the Attentional Control Theory was assessed. The methods used were partially based on previously published research by Wood, Vine, and Wilson (2016). Ten experienced shooters went through three shooting conditions (baseline shooting, traditional Stroop shooting, and reverse Stroop shooting) while equipped with eye tracking glasses to record eye movement. One-way ANOVA with repeated measures showed that the mean shooting performance was the best in the baseline condition as well as it yielded the longest QED compared to both experimental conditions. No significant difference was found between reverse Stroop shooting and traditional Stroop shooting. The study provides insights in how the Stroop task and eye tracking can be used to assess shooting performance and quiet eye duration in controlled laboratory setting.},
  author       = {Gunnarsson, Grímur},
  keyword      = {quiet eye,quiet eye duration,shooting performance,Stroop task,cognitive workload},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The Effect of Cognitive Workload on Shooting Performance and Quiet Eye Duration},
  year         = {2018},
}