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Reaching for recognition and greening for growth : perceptions of justice with regard to Sámi reindeer husbandry and wind energy in Norway

Kaapke, Niklas LU (2018) In Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science MESM02 20181
LUCSUS (Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies)
Abstract
In the face of climate change wind energy plays an increasing role in Norway. The construction of new wind farms causes opposition and conflicts with, among others, Sámi reindeer herders who are concerned about losing their pastures. By using Schlosberg’s (2004) environmental justice framework, I explore the justice implications of wind energy with regard to Sámi reindeer husbandry in the case of Fosen wind park in Mid-Norway. I find diverging perceptions of justice as distribution, as recognition and as procedure among the stakeholders. The wind park causes distributive concerns for the local Sámi reindeer herders who are worried that they will lose some of their winter pastures and partially need to quit their business. In contrast,... (More)
In the face of climate change wind energy plays an increasing role in Norway. The construction of new wind farms causes opposition and conflicts with, among others, Sámi reindeer herders who are concerned about losing their pastures. By using Schlosberg’s (2004) environmental justice framework, I explore the justice implications of wind energy with regard to Sámi reindeer husbandry in the case of Fosen wind park in Mid-Norway. I find diverging perceptions of justice as distribution, as recognition and as procedure among the stakeholders. The wind park causes distributive concerns for the local Sámi reindeer herders who are worried that they will lose some of their winter pastures and partially need to quit their business. In contrast, supporters of the Fosen wind park mainly see its economic benefits. Wind energy in terms of climate change mitigation does not play a major role in the analysed justice perceptions. Whereas the supporters of the wind park consider compensation as justified means to balance the negative impacts on reindeer husbandry, the need for money is barely expressed in Sámi reindeer herders’ claims. Instead, their justice perceptions go beyond distributive concerns and are based on claims of recognition. They highlight the importance of reindeer husbandry for Sámi culture. Furthermore, identity claims of the herders are based on colonial perceptions of a powerful state that does not recognise Sámi concerns. Although Sámi reindeer herders were consulted in the planning process for Fosen wind park their voice was not heard in the final decision. What initially seemed to be a simple land use conflict driven by measures of climate change mitigation, is actually a struggle for recognition of the Sámi in Norway. Hence, final recommendations in this paper mainly aim to address the dimension of justice as recognition. (Less)
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author
Kaapke, Niklas LU
supervisor
organization
course
MESM02 20181
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Sámi, reindeer husbandry, wind energy, environmental justice, sustainability science
publication/series
Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science
report number
2018:011
funder
Protestant Academic Foundation Villigst
language
English
id
8946697
date added to LUP
2018-06-16 11:52:18
date last changed
2018-06-16 11:52:58
@misc{8946697,
  abstract     = {In the face of climate change wind energy plays an increasing role in Norway. The construction of new wind farms causes opposition and conflicts with, among others, Sámi reindeer herders who are concerned about losing their pastures. By using Schlosberg’s (2004) environmental justice framework, I explore the justice implications of wind energy with regard to Sámi reindeer husbandry in the case of Fosen wind park in Mid-Norway. I find diverging perceptions of justice as distribution, as recognition and as procedure among the stakeholders. The wind park causes distributive concerns for the local Sámi reindeer herders who are worried that they will lose some of their winter pastures and partially need to quit their business. In contrast, supporters of the Fosen wind park mainly see its economic benefits. Wind energy in terms of climate change mitigation does not play a major role in the analysed justice perceptions. Whereas the supporters of the wind park consider compensation as justified means to balance the negative impacts on reindeer husbandry, the need for money is barely expressed in Sámi reindeer herders’ claims. Instead, their justice perceptions go beyond distributive concerns and are based on claims of recognition. They highlight the importance of reindeer husbandry for Sámi culture. Furthermore, identity claims of the herders are based on colonial perceptions of a powerful state that does not recognise Sámi concerns. Although Sámi reindeer herders were consulted in the planning process for Fosen wind park their voice was not heard in the final decision. What initially seemed to be a simple land use conflict driven by measures of climate change mitigation, is actually a struggle for recognition of the Sámi in Norway. Hence, final recommendations in this paper mainly aim to address the dimension of justice as recognition.},
  author       = {Kaapke, Niklas},
  keyword      = {Sámi,reindeer husbandry,wind energy,environmental justice,sustainability science},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  series       = {Master Thesis Series in Environmental Studies and Sustainability Science},
  title        = {Reaching for recognition and greening for growth : perceptions of justice with regard to Sámi reindeer husbandry and wind energy in Norway},
  year         = {2018},
}