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Depression Stigma in University Students: Faculty Differences, and Effects of Written De-stigmatisation Strategies

Stott, Matthew LU (2018) PSYP01 20181
Department of Psychology
Abstract
Stigma towards mental illness remains prominent today, and has significant negative impacts on treatment-seeking, outcome, and many aspects of life. De-stigmatisation strategies have been developed to target familiarity and knowledge, with some limited evidence for their success. The aim of this research was to investigate if faculty differences in stigma are present in a sample of 109 university students, and if familiarity with mental illness influences scores on stigma-related measures. Additionally, an aim was to assess any impact of brief, written de-tigmatising strategies on knowledge and stigma. Results indicated some differences between faculties on stigma-related measures, with engineering students showing greater stereotype... (More)
Stigma towards mental illness remains prominent today, and has significant negative impacts on treatment-seeking, outcome, and many aspects of life. De-stigmatisation strategies have been developed to target familiarity and knowledge, with some limited evidence for their success. The aim of this research was to investigate if faculty differences in stigma are present in a sample of 109 university students, and if familiarity with mental illness influences scores on stigma-related measures. Additionally, an aim was to assess any impact of brief, written de-tigmatising strategies on knowledge and stigma. Results indicated some differences between faculties on stigma-related measures, with engineering students showing greater stereotype attribution and less depression literacy. Those familiar with mental illness displayed less stigmatising attitudes, and greater literacy. Participants were assigned to read one of four types of written materials after completing the first set of measures. While there were no significant differences between texts on changes in literacy, there were some changes in stigma, and stereotype attributions. Results support previous findings of faculty differences in some but not all stigma measures, and the influence of familiarity on stigma measures. There is some support for brief intervention efficacy in written format. Possible methodological issues include the sampling method and the extensive use of self-report measures. (Less)
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author
Stott, Matthew LU
supervisor
organization
course
PSYP01 20181
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
stigma, depression, mental illness, familiarity, stereotypes, literacy, university students
language
English
id
8948981
date added to LUP
2018-06-13 12:48:04
date last changed
2018-06-13 12:48:04
@misc{8948981,
  abstract     = {Stigma towards mental illness remains prominent today, and has significant negative impacts on treatment-seeking, outcome, and many aspects of life. De-stigmatisation strategies have been developed to target familiarity and knowledge, with some limited evidence for their success. The aim of this research was to investigate if faculty differences in stigma are present in a sample of 109 university students, and if familiarity with mental illness influences scores on stigma-related measures. Additionally, an aim was to assess any impact of brief, written de-tigmatising strategies on knowledge and stigma. Results indicated some differences between faculties on stigma-related measures, with engineering students showing greater stereotype attribution and less depression literacy. Those familiar with mental illness displayed less stigmatising attitudes, and greater literacy. Participants were assigned to read one of four types of written materials after completing the first set of measures. While there were no significant differences between texts on changes in literacy, there were some changes in stigma, and stereotype attributions. Results support previous findings of faculty differences in some but not all stigma measures, and the influence of familiarity on stigma measures. There is some support for brief intervention efficacy in written format. Possible methodological issues include the sampling method and the extensive use of self-report measures.},
  author       = {Stott, Matthew},
  keyword      = {stigma,depression,mental illness,familiarity,stereotypes,literacy,university students},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Depression Stigma in University Students: Faculty Differences, and Effects of Written De-stigmatisation Strategies},
  year         = {2018},
}