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The Influence of Big Five Personality Traits on Dual-Process Cognitive Information Processing Styles in Medical Decision-Making

Madjaroski, Goran LU (2018) PSYP02 20181
Department of Psychology
Abstract
We all make decisions, but when medical professionals do it, it can literally mean life or death. Decisions are influenced by many factors. The aim of the present study was to investigate if personality traits as proposed by the Big Five Model influence the Rational and Experiential cognitive information processing styles as proposed by the dual-process Cognitive-Experiential Self-Theory theory in medical decision-making. A sample of doctors and nurses (N=102) from various medical institutions in Macedonia was presented with an online survey containing Big Five Factors Inventory (Goldberg, 1992) and REI-40 (Paccini & Epstain, 1999). The results showed significant relation for Openness and Conscientiousness with Rationality and... (More)
We all make decisions, but when medical professionals do it, it can literally mean life or death. Decisions are influenced by many factors. The aim of the present study was to investigate if personality traits as proposed by the Big Five Model influence the Rational and Experiential cognitive information processing styles as proposed by the dual-process Cognitive-Experiential Self-Theory theory in medical decision-making. A sample of doctors and nurses (N=102) from various medical institutions in Macedonia was presented with an online survey containing Big Five Factors Inventory (Goldberg, 1992) and REI-40 (Paccini & Epstain, 1999). The results showed significant relation for Openness and Conscientiousness with Rationality and Agreeableness with Experientiality. Neuroticism showed significant positive influence on one of the sub-dimensions of Rationality, the Rational Ability, but not on Rationality in total. The medical professionals demonstrated clear preference towards Rationality over Experientiality. The importance of these results is further discussed in context of somewhat similar research. (Less)
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author
Madjaroski, Goran LU
supervisor
organization
alternative title
Big Five Traits and Dual-Processing Styles in Medical Decision-Making
course
PSYP02 20181
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
dual-process, Big Five, CEST, REI, Rationality, Experientiality, cognitive information processing, medical decision-making
language
English
id
8950015
date added to LUP
2018-06-18 09:30:36
date last changed
2018-06-18 09:30:36
@misc{8950015,
  abstract     = {We all make decisions, but when medical professionals do it, it can literally mean life or death. Decisions are influenced by many factors. The aim of the present study was to investigate if personality traits as proposed by the Big Five Model influence the Rational and Experiential cognitive information processing styles as proposed by the dual-process Cognitive-Experiential Self-Theory theory in medical decision-making. A sample of doctors and nurses (N=102) from various medical institutions in Macedonia was presented with an online survey containing Big Five Factors Inventory (Goldberg, 1992) and REI-40 (Paccini & Epstain, 1999). The results showed significant relation for Openness and Conscientiousness with Rationality and Agreeableness with Experientiality. Neuroticism showed significant positive influence on one of the sub-dimensions of Rationality, the Rational Ability, but not on Rationality in total. The medical professionals demonstrated clear preference towards Rationality over Experientiality. The importance of these results is further discussed in context of somewhat similar research.},
  author       = {Madjaroski, Goran},
  keyword      = {dual-process,Big Five,CEST,REI,Rationality,Experientiality,cognitive information processing,medical decision-making},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The Influence of Big Five Personality Traits on Dual-Process Cognitive Information Processing Styles in Medical Decision-Making},
  year         = {2018},
}