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Disciplining Rural Cadres: Anti-corruption and Party Building in North China, 1979-1981

Yang, Long (2018) ACET35
Centre for East and South-East Asian Studies, Lund University
Abstract
This thesis explores the Chinese Communist Party (CCP)’s reestablishment of disciplinary organs from the central to township/commune levels in the early post-Mao era (1979-1981). It set out to show why such organs came into being and how, with their help, the party attempted to strengthen its infrastructure and adopt specific measures to prevent the abuses of power at the grassroots level. The research undergirding the thesis is based on two types of previously unexamined primary sources: (1) official documents in the public domain and (2) selectively declassified party journals. The existing literature on anti-corruption campaigns in China since 1980s has so far paid little attention to the issue of how discipline organs at the county... (More)
This thesis explores the Chinese Communist Party (CCP)’s reestablishment of disciplinary organs from the central to township/commune levels in the early post-Mao era (1979-1981). It set out to show why such organs came into being and how, with their help, the party attempted to strengthen its infrastructure and adopt specific measures to prevent the abuses of power at the grassroots level. The research undergirding the thesis is based on two types of previously unexamined primary sources: (1) official documents in the public domain and (2) selectively declassified party journals. The existing literature on anti-corruption campaigns in China since 1980s has so far paid little attention to the issue of how discipline organs at the county level put the anti-corruption policies into practice. Drawing on the theoretical resources of state building, party building, and institutional change, this research provides new insights into the CCP’s efforts to deal with and eliminate rural cadres’ embezzlement, mismanagement of public funds, and novel forms of corruption in the economic sphere. In response to a sharp increase in corrupt activities stemming from China’s transition from a centrally planned to a market economy, the CCP adopted stiffer measures in two ways: (1) institutionalization of disciplinary organs and (2) professionalization of anti-corruption investigations. This would provide a strong foundation for China’s ongoing institutional change in the supervisory agency since 2012 onwards. (Less)
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author
Yang, Long
supervisor
organization
course
ACET35
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Anti-corruption, Rural Cadres, Party Building, State Building, Institutional Change, North China
language
English
id
8954051
date added to LUP
2018-07-02 10:38:47
date last changed
2018-07-02 10:38:47
@misc{8954051,
  abstract     = {This thesis explores the Chinese Communist Party (CCP)’s reestablishment of disciplinary organs from the central to township/commune levels in the early post-Mao era (1979-1981). It set out to show why such organs came into being and how, with their help, the party attempted to strengthen its infrastructure and adopt specific measures to prevent the abuses of power at the grassroots level. The research undergirding the thesis is based on two types of previously unexamined primary sources: (1) official documents in the public domain and (2) selectively declassified party journals. The existing literature on anti-corruption campaigns in China since 1980s has so far paid little attention to the issue of how discipline organs at the county level put the anti-corruption policies into practice. Drawing on the theoretical resources of state building, party building, and institutional change, this research provides new insights into the CCP’s efforts to deal with and eliminate rural cadres’ embezzlement, mismanagement of public funds, and novel forms of corruption in the economic sphere. In response to a sharp increase in corrupt activities stemming from China’s transition from a centrally planned to a market economy, the CCP adopted stiffer measures in two ways: (1) institutionalization of disciplinary organs and (2) professionalization of anti-corruption investigations. This would provide a strong foundation for China’s ongoing institutional change in the supervisory agency since 2012 onwards.},
  author       = {Yang, Long},
  keyword      = {Anti-corruption,Rural Cadres,Party Building,State Building,Institutional Change,North China},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Disciplining Rural Cadres: Anti-corruption and Party Building in North China, 1979-1981},
  year         = {2018},
}