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Participation of urban social movements in city development processes. A case study exploring strategies of an urban social movement in Frankfurt-Bockenheim

Frowerk, Lena-Sophie LU (2018) SGEM07 20181
Department of Human Geography
Abstract
Participation in urban development processes is increasingly demanded by citizens. In fighting for the ‘Right to the City’ urban social movements are acting as representatives of citizens and are incorporated within a complex network of power relations between several stakeholders involved. Theses power relations shape the extent of citizen participation in these processes. This thesis aims at contributing to an understanding of how urban social movements influence the use of neoliberalised urban space. This was done by elaborating an urban social movement actively engaged in Frankfurt-Bockenheim. A qualitative research design applying participant observations, guided interviews and document analysis was chosen. It was found that coping... (More)
Participation in urban development processes is increasingly demanded by citizens. In fighting for the ‘Right to the City’ urban social movements are acting as representatives of citizens and are incorporated within a complex network of power relations between several stakeholders involved. Theses power relations shape the extent of citizen participation in these processes. This thesis aims at contributing to an understanding of how urban social movements influence the use of neoliberalised urban space. This was done by elaborating an urban social movement actively engaged in Frankfurt-Bockenheim. A qualitative research design applying participant observations, guided interviews and document analysis was chosen. It was found that coping with being in a marginalised position in the network of most powerful stakeholders the urban social movement adopts a two-pronged approach with cooperative and more radical strategies. The strategies chosen can be categorised in two groups which are [1] providing information (for the movement itself and for the residents) and [2] building networks. By doing so the urban social movement empowers itself and thereby challenges the existing distribution of power. By setting these findings in relation to Lefebvre’s multi-level understanding of urban processes and Arnstein’s typology of citizen participation it could be shown that the strategies chosen are shaped by and at the same time affect the relationship to the municipality. This relationship is highly ambivalent and subject to constant changes which also affects the movement’s degree of participation in urban development and planning processes. (Less)
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author
Frowerk, Lena-Sophie LU
supervisor
organization
course
SGEM07 20181
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
urban social movement, citizen participation, urban planning and development, Frankfurt-Bockenheim
language
English
id
8957605
date added to LUP
2018-09-03 11:03:52
date last changed
2018-09-03 11:03:52
@misc{8957605,
  abstract     = {Participation in urban development processes is increasingly demanded by citizens. In fighting for the ‘Right to the City’ urban social movements are acting as representatives of citizens and are incorporated within a complex network of power relations between several stakeholders involved. Theses power relations shape the extent of citizen participation in these processes. This thesis aims at contributing to an understanding of how urban social movements influence the use of neoliberalised urban space. This was done by elaborating an urban social movement actively engaged in Frankfurt-Bockenheim. A qualitative research design applying participant observations, guided interviews and document analysis was chosen. It was found that coping with being in a marginalised position in the network of most powerful stakeholders the urban social movement adopts a two-pronged approach with cooperative and more radical strategies. The strategies chosen can be categorised in two groups which are [1] providing information (for the movement itself and for the residents) and [2] building networks. By doing so the urban social movement empowers itself and thereby challenges the existing distribution of power. By setting these findings in relation to Lefebvre’s multi-level understanding of urban processes and Arnstein’s typology of citizen participation it could be shown that the strategies chosen are shaped by and at the same time affect the relationship to the municipality. This relationship is highly ambivalent and subject to constant changes which also affects the movement’s degree of participation in urban development and planning processes.},
  author       = {Frowerk, Lena-Sophie},
  keyword      = {urban social movement,citizen participation,urban planning and development,Frankfurt-Bockenheim},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Participation of urban social movements in city development processes. A case study exploring strategies of an urban social movement in Frankfurt-Bockenheim},
  year         = {2018},
}