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Exploring the household and community: How gender norms condition access to assets in a disaster context. A qualitative case study of the 2015 floods in Magway region, Myanmar

Uggla, Karin LU (2019) MIDM19 20182
Department of Human Geography
LUMID International Master programme in applied International Development and Management
Abstract
Gender is a largely neglected analytical category within disaster and climate-related
research. More research is required on underlying causes to vulnerability and
resilience from climate hazards and disasters. Feminist research recommends that
future research should explore gender and power dynamics through an intersectional
lens. This master’s thesis explores how gender norms and inequality contribute to
rural women and men’s ability to respond and recover from a flood event that took
place in Magway region, Myanmar in 2015. It explores access to economic and social
capital assets generally, as well as during and after the event. Through a qualitative
case study design, the study applies focus groups, group discussions and... (More)
Gender is a largely neglected analytical category within disaster and climate-related
research. More research is required on underlying causes to vulnerability and
resilience from climate hazards and disasters. Feminist research recommends that
future research should explore gender and power dynamics through an intersectional
lens. This master’s thesis explores how gender norms and inequality contribute to
rural women and men’s ability to respond and recover from a flood event that took
place in Magway region, Myanmar in 2015. It explores access to economic and social
capital assets generally, as well as during and after the event. Through a qualitative
case study design, the study applies focus groups, group discussions and in-depth
individual household interviews with female household heads, married women in
male-headed households and their husbands. The study further studies broader
dynamics and norms within society. The findings suggest that gender norms and
intersecting (gendered) inequalities shape access to economic and social capital assets
differently for different households. Wealthier male-headed farming households have
generally recovered faster than female-headed households that are casual labourers in
agriculture. Differences between men and women exist in access to social capital, also
within married households, however it was especially prominent for female-headed
households. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Uggla, Karin LU
supervisor
organization
course
MIDM19 20182
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
vulnerability, resilience, disaster, hazard, coping capacity, response, recovery, adaptive capacity, climate change, floods, intersectionality, gender, Myanmar, Magway, dry-zone
language
English
id
8967802
date added to LUP
2019-08-13 14:08:19
date last changed
2019-08-13 14:08:19
@misc{8967802,
  abstract     = {Gender is a largely neglected analytical category within disaster and climate-related
research. More research is required on underlying causes to vulnerability and
resilience from climate hazards and disasters. Feminist research recommends that
future research should explore gender and power dynamics through an intersectional
lens. This master’s thesis explores how gender norms and inequality contribute to
rural women and men’s ability to respond and recover from a flood event that took
place in Magway region, Myanmar in 2015. It explores access to economic and social
capital assets generally, as well as during and after the event. Through a qualitative
case study design, the study applies focus groups, group discussions and in-depth
individual household interviews with female household heads, married women in
male-headed households and their husbands. The study further studies broader
dynamics and norms within society. The findings suggest that gender norms and
intersecting (gendered) inequalities shape access to economic and social capital assets
differently for different households. Wealthier male-headed farming households have
generally recovered faster than female-headed households that are casual labourers in
agriculture. Differences between men and women exist in access to social capital, also
within married households, however it was especially prominent for female-headed
households.},
  author       = {Uggla, Karin},
  keyword      = {vulnerability,resilience,disaster,hazard,coping capacity,response,recovery,adaptive capacity,climate change,floods,intersectionality,gender,Myanmar,Magway,dry-zone},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Exploring the household and community: How gender norms condition access to assets in a disaster context. A qualitative case study of the 2015 floods in Magway region, Myanmar},
  year         = {2019},
}