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”Missbruk är ett missbruk oavsett var man kommer ifrån.” : En kvalitativ intervjustudie om klass och missbruk

Nilsson, Hanna LU and Schön, Angelica LU (2019) SOPA63 20191
School of Social Work
Abstract
”Addiction is addiction no matter where you’re from” – A qualitative interview study about class and substance abuse

The aim of this study was to examine social workers’ perception of class and its relevance within the work of substance abuse care in the Swedish social services and the relationship between social worker and client. Furthermore, the study also examined the social workers’ perspective on their clients’ perception of class and its relevance in their contact with the social services. The sample population of the study was Swedish social workers’ that handles substance abuse for the social services. Through seven semi-structured interviews we studied the social workers perception of class and its perceived relevance for the... (More)
”Addiction is addiction no matter where you’re from” – A qualitative interview study about class and substance abuse

The aim of this study was to examine social workers’ perception of class and its relevance within the work of substance abuse care in the Swedish social services and the relationship between social worker and client. Furthermore, the study also examined the social workers’ perspective on their clients’ perception of class and its relevance in their contact with the social services. The sample population of the study was Swedish social workers’ that handles substance abuse for the social services. Through seven semi-structured interviews we studied the social workers perception of class and its perceived relevance for the clients they have been working with. Class was defined and analyzed through Bourdieu’s class theory. The interviews were also analyzed with theories of stigma and shame. The results showed that class is relevant when it comes to shame and stigma within perceived higher classes. There was also an idea among the social workers that clients with a perceived higher class were more likely to put demands on what help they should be receiving. The social workers also showed an aversion toward using the word ‘class’ and chose to use other words to express themselves. In addition, class also had an effect when it came to clients’ different levels of need for aid and assistance. The conclusion of the study was that class is relevant within the work of substance abuse care in Swedish social services. (Less)
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author
Nilsson, Hanna LU and Schön, Angelica LU
supervisor
organization
course
SOPA63 20191
year
type
M2 - Bachelor Degree
subject
keywords
Class, social work, substance abuse, addiction, Bourdieu
language
Swedish
id
8980093
date added to LUP
2019-06-14 11:18:26
date last changed
2019-06-14 11:18:26
@misc{8980093,
  abstract     = {”Addiction is addiction no matter where you’re from” – A qualitative interview study about class and substance abuse

The aim of this study was to examine social workers’ perception of class and its relevance within the work of substance abuse care in the Swedish social services and the relationship between social worker and client. Furthermore, the study also examined the social workers’ perspective on their clients’ perception of class and its relevance in their contact with the social services. The sample population of the study was Swedish social workers’ that handles substance abuse for the social services. Through seven semi-structured interviews we studied the social workers perception of class and its perceived relevance for the clients they have been working with. Class was defined and analyzed through Bourdieu’s class theory. The interviews were also analyzed with theories of stigma and shame. The results showed that class is relevant when it comes to shame and stigma within perceived higher classes. There was also an idea among the social workers that clients with a perceived higher class were more likely to put demands on what help they should be receiving. The social workers also showed an aversion toward using the word ‘class’ and chose to use other words to express themselves. In addition, class also had an effect when it came to clients’ different levels of need for aid and assistance. The conclusion of the study was that class is relevant within the work of substance abuse care in Swedish social services.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Hanna and Schön, Angelica},
  keyword      = {Class,social work,substance abuse,addiction,Bourdieu},
  language     = {swe},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {”Missbruk är ett missbruk oavsett var man kommer ifrån.” : En kvalitativ intervjustudie om klass och missbruk},
  year         = {2019},
}