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Heat processing and storage of a berry-based beverage and its influence on polyphenolic compounds – a preparatory analysis of a study product for a clinical trial

Arbab, Olivia LU (2019) KLGM01 20191
Food Technology and Nutrition (M.Sc.)
Abstract
Research suggests that polyphenols, such as anthocyanins, that are found in considerable amounts in many types of berries, contributes with a positive effect on human cognition. However, clinical trials are warranted to support these findings. Preparation for such a trial includes developing a berry-rich study product and a corresponding reference beverage. Phenolic compounds are highly unstable and risks deterioration when processing and heat treatments are involved. This report provides information on the fate of the phenolic compounds in a berry dense beverage after pasteurization and during storage at different temperatures. The berry beverage was pasteurized at two different temperatures, with a 30 s holding time, and stored at three... (More)
Research suggests that polyphenols, such as anthocyanins, that are found in considerable amounts in many types of berries, contributes with a positive effect on human cognition. However, clinical trials are warranted to support these findings. Preparation for such a trial includes developing a berry-rich study product and a corresponding reference beverage. Phenolic compounds are highly unstable and risks deterioration when processing and heat treatments are involved. This report provides information on the fate of the phenolic compounds in a berry dense beverage after pasteurization and during storage at different temperatures. The berry beverage was pasteurized at two different temperatures, with a 30 s holding time, and stored at three different temperatures for three months. Total polyphenolics (PF) were measured using the Folin Ciocalteu method (Singleton and Rossi, 1965) and the monomeric anthocyanins (MAC) were measured using the pH-differential method (Sondheimer and Kertesz, 1948). PF recoveries immediately after processing and pasteurization at 80 and 90 °C were measured to ~104% and ~94%, respectively, and MAC was measured to ~94% and ~90%, respectively. The PF losses after three months of storage at +22 °C, + 4 °C and -20 °C, were 28-38%, 14-47% and 3-6%, respectively, and the MAC losses were 87-91%, 87-91% and 77-79%, respectively. Polymeric pigment content did not immediately increase due to pasteurization but increased during time at all storage temperatures. After three months, the +22 °C, + 4 °C and -20 °C stored samples contained ~14%, ~7% and ~5% polymeric pigments, respectively. These results suggest that heating and storage temperature affect the phenolic compounds and that frozen storage (-20 °C) is recommended for a berry dense beverage as it appears to best preserve the polyphenolic compounds. In conclusion, processing, pasteurization and storage at -20 °C for up to three months, does not deteriorate polyphenolics in amounts that should risk insignificant results in the upcoming clinical trial. Additionally, a reference beverage with matched nutritional value was successfully formulated to mimic a berry-based beverage and hence, the development of required study beverages are finalized in order for the clinical trial to begin. (Less)
Popular Abstract
We all know someone with age-related brain diseases such as dementia. Up to date, around 50 million people worldwide suffers from some type of dementia disorder and around 10 million new cases are reported every year according to WHO. As the population grows older, this issue is highly prioritized to solve. Berries are now in the spotlight as potential dementia fighters.

The hidden force of berries
So, what is it with berries that has spread the rumor of them as potential health providers? The hidden super force of berries may be a group of molecules called polyphenols which, in our daily life, are referred to as “antioxidants”. Berries, as we usually know them, are characterized by their bright red or blue-like color, which is... (More)
We all know someone with age-related brain diseases such as dementia. Up to date, around 50 million people worldwide suffers from some type of dementia disorder and around 10 million new cases are reported every year according to WHO. As the population grows older, this issue is highly prioritized to solve. Berries are now in the spotlight as potential dementia fighters.

The hidden force of berries
So, what is it with berries that has spread the rumor of them as potential health providers? The hidden super force of berries may be a group of molecules called polyphenols which, in our daily life, are referred to as “antioxidants”. Berries, as we usually know them, are characterized by their bright red or blue-like color, which is actually provided by a specific type of polyphenol called anthocyanins. A drawback with these antioxidative molecules, are that they are very sensitive to heat, oxygen and light. This is problematic when berries are used in products such as jams, beverages and desserts, as industrial production usually includes quite harsh processing steps. Therefore, it has been of interest to measure and follow the amounts of anthocyanins that are left in berry products after industrial processing and storage at different temperatures. This has recently been done for a berry beverage based on two types of berries with a little splash of commercial juice. We want to know how healthy a ready-to-drink berry smoothie actually is, right?

Drink and think!
As it appears, a berry beverage is not too affected by industrial processing and heat treatment. Definitely, this depends on the specific production process that the berries have undergone, but the conclusion was that a typical pasteurization procedure does not jeopardize the expected health benefit provided by the beverage. Even though a slight reduction in the anthocyanin amount have been observed in the study beverage, it will still contain anthocyanins in amounts that are considered significantly relevant for a possible improvement of your brain function – thanks to the high berry concentration.

You may have thought – for how long that smoothie has been standing there for? While walking the aisles in your local store. Actually, if you want to store a berry dense beverage, you should do that in a freezer as this showed to preserve the anthocyanin content over a longer period of time. Still, fridge storing is not too bad and will contain considerable anthocyanin amounts even after three months of storage if comparing with room-temperature storage.

For future, this information is highly valuable as it functions as a first step towards a commercial berry-rich beverage that is customized for improving brain function of the general public. Until then, keep drinking those bought (or homemade) berry smoothies in order to reduce the risk of losing your memory as you grow older! (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Arbab, Olivia LU
supervisor
organization
course
KLGM01 20191
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Food technology, Livsmedelsteknologi
language
English
id
8995553
date added to LUP
2019-10-22 10:00:03
date last changed
2019-10-22 10:00:03
@misc{8995553,
  abstract     = {Research suggests that polyphenols, such as anthocyanins, that are found in considerable amounts in many types of berries, contributes with a positive effect on human cognition. However, clinical trials are warranted to support these findings. Preparation for such a trial includes developing a berry-rich study product and a corresponding reference beverage. Phenolic compounds are highly unstable and risks deterioration when processing and heat treatments are involved. This report provides information on the fate of the phenolic compounds in a berry dense beverage after pasteurization and during storage at different temperatures. The berry beverage was pasteurized at two different temperatures, with a 30 s holding time, and stored at three different temperatures for three months. Total polyphenolics (PF) were measured using the Folin Ciocalteu method (Singleton and Rossi, 1965) and the monomeric anthocyanins (MAC) were measured using the pH-differential method (Sondheimer and Kertesz, 1948). PF recoveries immediately after processing and pasteurization at 80 and 90 °C were measured to ~104% and ~94%, respectively, and MAC was measured to ~94% and ~90%, respectively. The PF losses after three months of storage at +22 °C, + 4 °C and -20 °C, were 28-38%, 14-47% and 3-6%, respectively, and the MAC losses were 87-91%, 87-91% and 77-79%, respectively. Polymeric pigment content did not immediately increase due to pasteurization but increased during time at all storage temperatures. After three months, the +22 °C, + 4 °C and -20 °C stored samples contained ~14%, ~7% and ~5% polymeric pigments, respectively. These results suggest that heating and storage temperature affect the phenolic compounds and that frozen storage (-20 °C) is recommended for a berry dense beverage as it appears to best preserve the polyphenolic compounds. In conclusion, processing, pasteurization and storage at -20 °C for up to three months, does not deteriorate polyphenolics in amounts that should risk insignificant results in the upcoming clinical trial. Additionally, a reference beverage with matched nutritional value was successfully formulated to mimic a berry-based beverage and hence, the development of required study beverages are finalized in order for the clinical trial to begin.},
  author       = {Arbab, Olivia},
  keyword      = {Food technology,Livsmedelsteknologi},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Heat processing and storage of a berry-based beverage and its influence on polyphenolic compounds – a preparatory analysis of a study product for a clinical trial},
  year         = {2019},
}