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The Life Cycle Deficit in Sweden 1999-2018: Analysing the Influence of Demographic, Labour Market and Health Indicators

Flick, Victor Daniel Francis LU (2020) EKHS02 20201
Department of Economic History
Abstract (Swedish)
Population aging has tremendous economic consequences and generates an unprecedented pressure on the welfare state. As the number and share of ‘dependent’ people grows, the state struggles to finance pensions and health-related costs. In this optic, Sweden is no exception: the mean age of the population, life expectancy and share of people above 65 continuously increase – which warrants the focus of the study.

In this context, the thesis basis itself on the life cycle approach and the concept of national transfer accounts. The two theories enable to find a life cycle deficit (LCD) in the society: people consume more than they produce. In this framework, the thesis aims at uncovering and discussing the influence of demographic, labour... (More)
Population aging has tremendous economic consequences and generates an unprecedented pressure on the welfare state. As the number and share of ‘dependent’ people grows, the state struggles to finance pensions and health-related costs. In this optic, Sweden is no exception: the mean age of the population, life expectancy and share of people above 65 continuously increase – which warrants the focus of the study.

In this context, the thesis basis itself on the life cycle approach and the concept of national transfer accounts. The two theories enable to find a life cycle deficit (LCD) in the society: people consume more than they produce. In this framework, the thesis aims at uncovering and discussing the influence of demographic, labour market and health factors in regards to the LCD in Sweden between 1999 and 2018. In an effort to provide more material for further research, the study investigates which indicators have positive or negative associations with the LCD. By looking into these new factors, the thesis holds an original stance and aims at contributing to the field, which lacks research on Sweden. The study uses longitudinal data gathered from Statistics Sweden and Eurostat.

The analysis finds compelling correlations between the investigated factors and the evolution of the LCD. The results present fertility as non-significant, immigration as beneficial for the LCD. And, whereas labour market factors contradict between males and females, health factors occasionally align with the literature yet occasionally surprising results arise. (Less)
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author
Flick, Victor Daniel Francis LU
supervisor
organization
course
EKHS02 20201
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
life cycle deficit, national transfer accounts, population aging, fertility, immigration, education, labour market, health
language
English
id
9021324
date added to LUP
2020-07-03 12:26:26
date last changed
2020-07-03 12:26:26
@misc{9021324,
  abstract     = {Population aging has tremendous economic consequences and generates an unprecedented pressure on the welfare state. As the number and share of ‘dependent’ people grows, the state struggles to finance pensions and health-related costs. In this optic, Sweden is no exception: the mean age of the population, life expectancy and share of people above 65 continuously increase – which warrants the focus of the study. 

In this context, the thesis basis itself on the life cycle approach and the concept of national transfer accounts. The two theories enable to find a life cycle deficit (LCD) in the society: people consume more than they produce. In this framework, the thesis aims at uncovering and discussing the influence of demographic, labour market and health factors in regards to the LCD in Sweden between 1999 and 2018. In an effort to provide more material for further research, the study investigates which indicators have positive or negative associations with the LCD. By looking into these new factors, the thesis holds an original stance and aims at contributing to the field, which lacks research on Sweden. The study uses longitudinal data gathered from Statistics Sweden and Eurostat. 

The analysis finds compelling correlations between the investigated factors and the evolution of the LCD. The results present fertility as non-significant, immigration as beneficial for the LCD. And, whereas labour market factors contradict between males and females, health factors occasionally align with the literature yet occasionally surprising results arise.},
  author       = {Flick, Victor Daniel Francis},
  keyword      = {life cycle deficit,national transfer accounts,population aging,fertility,immigration,education,labour market,health},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {The Life Cycle Deficit in Sweden 1999-2018: Analysing the Influence of Demographic, Labour Market and Health Indicators},
  year         = {2020},
}