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Flags don’t feed people: nationalism and agri-culture in the UK : a critical framing analysis of nationalism as it appears in British agri-cultural discourse in the context of Brexit

Carter, Anoushka LU (2020) HEKM51 20201
Human Geography
Human Ecology
Abstract
As Europe witnesses a rise in support of the far-right, more attention is being paid to why nationalistic sentiment is gaining popularity, particularly amongst rural populations. However, less known is how nationalism interacts with pressing ecological issues, even less so with agricultural matters. Given that a large proportion of farmers in the UK are said to have supported Brexit, it is important to better understand the relationship between the various iterations of nationalism, and how it is applied to problems affecting the future of agriculture. This is particularly salient as the UK is going through a reform in its agricultural policy after leaving the EU. This research reveals how agri-environmental issues are framed as issues of... (More)
As Europe witnesses a rise in support of the far-right, more attention is being paid to why nationalistic sentiment is gaining popularity, particularly amongst rural populations. However, less known is how nationalism interacts with pressing ecological issues, even less so with agricultural matters. Given that a large proportion of farmers in the UK are said to have supported Brexit, it is important to better understand the relationship between the various iterations of nationalism, and how it is applied to problems affecting the future of agriculture. This is particularly salient as the UK is going through a reform in its agricultural policy after leaving the EU. This research reveals how agri-environmental issues are framed as issues of concern for the nation. Through a critical framing analysis, I unearth some nuanced contemporary frames which highlight the synergies and paradoxes of nationalism as it approaches problems in agri-cultural issues in the context of Brexit and its conjuncture with the crisis of COVID-19 in 2020. The result of this analysis reveals how patriotism is framed by a variety of actors concerned with the future of the UK’s agriculture sector as a way for farmers to steward the land more sustainably. Additionally, this research elucidates a vision for conservation that depends on technology and a neoliberal approach to supporting farmers. Moreover, this thesis reveals how concepts typically associated with progressive movements for food justice are appropriated in the discourse of more right-wing groups, such as supporting the ‘local’ and ‘food sovereignty’. (Less)
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author
Carter, Anoushka LU
supervisor
organization
course
HEKM51 20201
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
Nationalism, agriculture, ecological patriotism, far right, neoliberal capitalism, ecomodernism
language
English
id
9025965
date added to LUP
2020-09-23 09:09:27
date last changed
2020-09-23 09:09:27
@misc{9025965,
  abstract     = {As Europe witnesses a rise in support of the far-right, more attention is being paid to why nationalistic sentiment is gaining popularity, particularly amongst rural populations. However, less known is how nationalism interacts with pressing ecological issues, even less so with agricultural matters. Given that a large proportion of farmers in the UK are said to have supported Brexit, it is important to better understand the relationship between the various iterations of nationalism, and how it is applied to problems affecting the future of agriculture. This is particularly salient as the UK is going through a reform in its agricultural policy after leaving the EU. This research reveals how agri-environmental issues are framed as issues of concern for the nation. Through a critical framing analysis, I unearth some nuanced contemporary frames which highlight the synergies and paradoxes of nationalism as it approaches problems in agri-cultural issues in the context of Brexit and its conjuncture with the crisis of COVID-19 in 2020. The result of this analysis reveals how patriotism is framed by a variety of actors concerned with the future of the UK’s agriculture sector as a way for farmers to steward the land more sustainably. Additionally, this research elucidates a vision for conservation that depends on technology and a neoliberal approach to supporting farmers. Moreover, this thesis reveals how concepts typically associated with progressive movements for food justice are appropriated in the discourse of more right-wing groups, such as supporting the ‘local’ and ‘food sovereignty’.},
  author       = {Carter, Anoushka},
  keyword      = {Nationalism,agriculture,ecological patriotism,far right,neoliberal capitalism,ecomodernism},
  language     = {eng},
  note         = {Student Paper},
  title        = {Flags don’t feed people: nationalism and agri-culture in the UK : a critical framing analysis of nationalism as it appears in British agri-cultural discourse in the context of Brexit},
  year         = {2020},
}