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Digital Food Technologies and Our Everyday Lives

Offei Lartey, Jared LU (2021) SMMM20 20211
Department of Service Management and Service Studies
Abstract
Amidst the present Covid-19 pandemic, consumer interactions with digital food technologies have expedited. This thesis examines how social network platforms and ethical consumption apps, enable and shape the everyday sustainable food consumption practice of young adults in Skåne, Sweden's southernmost region. Drawing on social practice theory and qualitative methods, the study addresses a discursive confusion on the ontology of sustainable food consumption practice. It provides new empirical evidence on technology-enabled skills and competencies for sustainable food consumption, and analyzes the ways that young adults are shaped by digital technologies. The empirical material consisted of fifteen in-depth interviews, which were analyzed... (More)
Amidst the present Covid-19 pandemic, consumer interactions with digital food technologies have expedited. This thesis examines how social network platforms and ethical consumption apps, enable and shape the everyday sustainable food consumption practice of young adults in Skåne, Sweden's southernmost region. Drawing on social practice theory and qualitative methods, the study addresses a discursive confusion on the ontology of sustainable food consumption practice. It provides new empirical evidence on technology-enabled skills and competencies for sustainable food consumption, and analyzes the ways that young adults are shaped by digital technologies. The empirical material consisted of fifteen in-depth interviews, which were analyzed based on ten emergent themes. Contrary to dominant conceptions of sustainable food consumption as an intention, decision outcome, or a derivate from core assumptions in sustainable development, the findings suggest that this practice is complex, multifaceted, and revolves on combinations from three lifestyles; practicing efficiency and no food waste, practicing responsible everyday food choices, and practicing environmental conscience. The findings also highlight four categories of skills and competencies enabled by digital food technologies, and suggest that, to translate these into action individuals must be conscious, creative and experimental. It concludes that digital technologies are no neutral mediators of food consumption, and the findings explain how young adults subvert, balance or consent the shaping of their food consumption sometimes sub-consciously. These findings altogether, lead to a post-study framework that identifies five preconditions for sustainable food consumption practice; personal suitability, valence, trust, available choices, and the paradox of price. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
Offei Lartey, Jared LU
supervisor
organization
alternative title
A Social Practice Analysis of Sustainable Food Consumption among Young Adults
course
SMMM20 20211
year
type
H2 - Master's Degree (Two Years)
subject
keywords
sustainable food consumption, digital technologies, social practice theory, social network platforms, ethical consumption apps, qualitative, Sweden.
language
English
additional info
This thesis is part of my research work at Lund University, funded by a Swedish Institute scholarship.
id
9051141
date added to LUP
2021-06-10 13:23:06
date last changed
2021-06-10 13:23:06
@misc{9051141,
  abstract     = {{Amidst the present Covid-19 pandemic, consumer interactions with digital food technologies have expedited. This thesis examines how social network platforms and ethical consumption apps, enable and shape the everyday sustainable food consumption practice of young adults in Skåne, Sweden's southernmost region. Drawing on social practice theory and qualitative methods, the study addresses a discursive confusion on the ontology of sustainable food consumption practice. It provides new empirical evidence on technology-enabled skills and competencies for sustainable food consumption, and analyzes the ways that young adults are shaped by digital technologies. The empirical material consisted of fifteen in-depth interviews, which were analyzed based on ten emergent themes. Contrary to dominant conceptions of sustainable food consumption as an intention, decision outcome, or a derivate from core assumptions in sustainable development, the findings suggest that this practice is complex, multifaceted, and revolves on combinations from three lifestyles; practicing efficiency and no food waste, practicing responsible everyday food choices, and practicing environmental conscience. The findings also highlight four categories of skills and competencies enabled by digital food technologies, and suggest that, to translate these into action individuals must be conscious, creative and experimental. It concludes that digital technologies are no neutral mediators of food consumption, and the findings explain how young adults subvert, balance or consent the shaping of their food consumption sometimes sub-consciously. These findings altogether, lead to a post-study framework that identifies five preconditions for sustainable food consumption practice; personal suitability, valence, trust, available choices, and the paradox of price.}},
  author       = {{Offei Lartey, Jared}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  note         = {{Student Paper}},
  title        = {{Digital Food Technologies and Our Everyday Lives}},
  year         = {{2021}},
}