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How is anticipation, as part of system resilience, operationalised on the flight deck, and to what extent does the regulation facilitate it?

Tervo, Tomi LU and Jokinen, Atte (2023) FLMU16 20221
Division of Risk Management and Societal Safety
Abstract
Resilience is a contemporary ‘hot topic’ in aviation - as well as in many other safety critical industries. The need for understanding resilience has been recognised since it has been noted that serious incidents and accidents are often related to very complex and unexpected situations and failures that cannot be managed with compliance, or which are not covered by existing procedures or checklists. In aviation, resilience has largely been defined as the capability of the crew to ‘bounce back’, meaning their ability to function in an unexpected and unplanned situation, where procedures do not suffice or exist, and which has not been covered by training. However, scientific literature sees many other shades of resilience. There are many... (More)
Resilience is a contemporary ‘hot topic’ in aviation - as well as in many other safety critical industries. The need for understanding resilience has been recognised since it has been noted that serious incidents and accidents are often related to very complex and unexpected situations and failures that cannot be managed with compliance, or which are not covered by existing procedures or checklists. In aviation, resilience has largely been defined as the capability of the crew to ‘bounce back’, meaning their ability to function in an unexpected and unplanned situation, where procedures do not suffice or exist, and which has not been covered by training. However, scientific literature sees many other shades of resilience. There are many interpretations of resilience not as an ‘ability’ that someone possesses, but instead a process that incorporates continuous potentials such as learning and anticipating, or ‘looking ahead’. Science also talks about resilience much more as a system function, instead of an ability at the sharp end. This qualitative study has its starting point in an interest on how the concept of resilience is implemented in aviation. The study has a special focus on ‘anticipation’, which seems to be recognised in science as a resilience potential but does not seem to receive corresponding recognition in the airline industry. This research deals with the definition and training of resilience and especially anticipation in the airline industry. The purpose is to view how the European regulator (EASA) defines resilience and what role it grants anticipation in resilience development. The research enters the airline organization from the perspective of flight crew training and explores how crews, instructors and examiners view the regulation, and how it further spreads via CRM and simulator training into line operation. This research also observes and compares how airline crews anticipate, and how they foresee the potential of risks and threats that affect normal operation by using skills and experience most effectively. (Less)
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author
Tervo, Tomi LU and Jokinen, Atte
supervisor
organization
course
FLMU16 20221
year
type
H1 - Master's Degree (One Year)
subject
keywords
Aviation, resilience, anticipation, experience, resilience development, EASA regulation, FLMU06
language
English
id
9140012
date added to LUP
2023-10-19 07:45:36
date last changed
2023-10-19 07:45:36
@misc{9140012,
  abstract     = {{Resilience is a contemporary ‘hot topic’ in aviation - as well as in many other safety critical industries. The need for understanding resilience has been recognised since it has been noted that serious incidents and accidents are often related to very complex and unexpected situations and failures that cannot be managed with compliance, or which are not covered by existing procedures or checklists. In aviation, resilience has largely been defined as the capability of the crew to ‘bounce back’, meaning their ability to function in an unexpected and unplanned situation, where procedures do not suffice or exist, and which has not been covered by training. However, scientific literature sees many other shades of resilience. There are many interpretations of resilience not as an ‘ability’ that someone possesses, but instead a process that incorporates continuous potentials such as learning and anticipating, or ‘looking ahead’. Science also talks about resilience much more as a system function, instead of an ability at the sharp end. This qualitative study has its starting point in an interest on how the concept of resilience is implemented in aviation. The study has a special focus on ‘anticipation’, which seems to be recognised in science as a resilience potential but does not seem to receive corresponding recognition in the airline industry. This research deals with the definition and training of resilience and especially anticipation in the airline industry. The purpose is to view how the European regulator (EASA) defines resilience and what role it grants anticipation in resilience development. The research enters the airline organization from the perspective of flight crew training and explores how crews, instructors and examiners view the regulation, and how it further spreads via CRM and simulator training into line operation. This research also observes and compares how airline crews anticipate, and how they foresee the potential of risks and threats that affect normal operation by using skills and experience most effectively.}},
  author       = {{Tervo, Tomi and Jokinen, Atte}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  note         = {{Student Paper}},
  title        = {{How is anticipation, as part of system resilience, operationalised on the flight deck, and to what extent does the regulation facilitate it?}},
  year         = {{2023}},
}