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Global climate policy and Deep decarbonisation of energy-intensive industries

Åhman, Max LU ; Nilsson, Lars J LU and Johansson, Bengt LU (2016) In Climate Policy p.1-16
Abstract (Swedish)
If we are to limit global warming to 2 °C, all sectors in all countries must reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases to zero not later than 2060 to 2080. Zero-emission options have been less explored and are less developed in the energy-intensive basic materials industry than in other sectors. Current climate policies have not yet motivated major efforts to decarbonize this sector, and it has been largely protected from climate policy due to perceived risks of carbon leakage and a focus on short-term reductions target to 2020. We argue that the future global climate policy regime must develop along three interlinked and strategic lines to facilitate a deep decarbonisation of the energy-intensive industries. First, the principle of... (More)
If we are to limit global warming to 2 °C, all sectors in all countries must reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases to zero not later than 2060 to 2080. Zero-emission options have been less explored and are less developed in the energy-intensive basic materials industry than in other sectors. Current climate policies have not yet motivated major efforts to decarbonize this sector, and it has been largely protected from climate policy due to perceived risks of carbon leakage and a focus on short-term reductions target to 2020. We argue that the future global climate policy regime must develop along three interlinked and strategic lines to facilitate a deep decarbonisation of the energy-intensive industries. First, the principle of common but differentiated responsibility must be reinterpreted to allow for a dialogue on fairness and the right to development in relation to industry. Second, greater focus on the development, deployment and transfer of technology in this sector is called for. Third, potential conflicts between current free trade regimes and motivated industrial policies for deep decarbonization must be resolved. One way forward is to revisit the idea of sectoral approaches but with a broader scope, including not only emission reductions, recognizing the full complexity of low carbon transitions in energy-intensive industries. A new approach could engage industrial stakeholders, support technology R&DD, and facilitate deployment through reducing the risk for investors. The Paris Agreement allows the idea of sectoral approaches to be revisited in the interest of reaching our common climate goals. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Climate change policies; decarbonisation; energy-intensive industries; innovation policy
in
Climate Policy
pages
16 pages
publisher
James & James
ISSN
1752-7457
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0582b0c9-b88d-4096-995a-90fc3c7d4928
alternative location
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14693062.2016.1167009
date added to LUP
2016-06-14 13:19:29
date last changed
2016-06-27 08:29:47
@misc{0582b0c9-b88d-4096-995a-90fc3c7d4928,
  abstract     = {If we are to limit global warming to 2 °C, all sectors in all countries must reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases to zero not later than 2060 to 2080. Zero-emission options have been less explored and are less developed in the energy-intensive basic materials industry than in other sectors. Current climate policies have not yet motivated major efforts to decarbonize this sector, and it has been largely protected from climate policy due to perceived risks of carbon leakage and a focus on short-term reductions target to 2020. We argue that the future global climate policy regime must develop along three interlinked and strategic lines to facilitate a deep decarbonisation of the energy-intensive industries. First, the principle of common but differentiated responsibility must be reinterpreted to allow for a dialogue on fairness and the right to development in relation to industry. Second, greater focus on the development, deployment and transfer of technology in this sector is called for. Third, potential conflicts between current free trade regimes and motivated industrial policies for deep decarbonization must be resolved. One way forward is to revisit the idea of sectoral approaches but with a broader scope, including not only emission reductions, recognizing the full complexity of low carbon transitions in energy-intensive industries. A new approach could engage industrial stakeholders, support technology R&DD, and facilitate deployment through reducing the risk for investors. The Paris Agreement allows the idea of sectoral approaches to be revisited in the interest of reaching our common climate goals. },
  author       = {Åhman, Max and Nilsson, Lars J and Johansson, Bengt},
  issn         = {1752-7457},
  keyword      = {Climate change policies; decarbonisation; energy-intensive industries; innovation policy},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {06},
  pages        = {1--16},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x8094f18)},
  series       = {Climate Policy},
  title        = {Global climate policy and Deep decarbonisation of energy-intensive industries},
  year         = {2016},
}