Advanced

Is weight loss beneficial for reduction of morbidity and mortality? What is the controversy about?

Nilsson, Peter LU (2008) In Diabetes Care 31 Suppl 2. p.278-283
Abstract
The increase of obesity and type 2 diabetes on a global scale has increased the interest in how to counteract this epidemic. Improved lifestyle in general is a fundamental approach, but other remedies such as specific weight reduction or diabetes preventive drugs and surgery have also been tested. One problem to understand is what really happens after weight loss. Ongoing studies will try to address this question, such as the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) surgery study, the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) trial in the U.S. (recruiting obese type 2 diabetic patients), and the Comprehensive Rimonabant Evaluation Study of Cardiovascular End Points and Outcomes (CRESCENDO) trial (by use of rimonabant versus placebo). This is very... (More)
The increase of obesity and type 2 diabetes on a global scale has increased the interest in how to counteract this epidemic. Improved lifestyle in general is a fundamental approach, but other remedies such as specific weight reduction or diabetes preventive drugs and surgery have also been tested. One problem to understand is what really happens after weight loss. Ongoing studies will try to address this question, such as the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) surgery study, the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) trial in the U.S. (recruiting obese type 2 diabetic patients), and the Comprehensive Rimonabant Evaluation Study of Cardiovascular End Points and Outcomes (CRESCENDO) trial (by use of rimonabant versus placebo). This is very important, since previously, several observational studies in large population-based cohorts have indicated some detrimental effects of weight loss, even after intentional weight loss, with increased morbidity and mortality rates. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Diabetes Care
volume
31 Suppl 2
pages
278 - 283
publisher
American Diabetes Association
external identifiers
  • PMID:18227497
  • WOS:000264701200029
  • Scopus:41149157926
ISSN
1935-5548
DOI
10.2337/dc08-s268
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
712bf907-688b-462d-83b3-5cca5cecdaab (old id 1041993)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18227497?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-03-03 15:37:08
date last changed
2016-12-04 04:38:09
@misc{712bf907-688b-462d-83b3-5cca5cecdaab,
  abstract     = {The increase of obesity and type 2 diabetes on a global scale has increased the interest in how to counteract this epidemic. Improved lifestyle in general is a fundamental approach, but other remedies such as specific weight reduction or diabetes preventive drugs and surgery have also been tested. One problem to understand is what really happens after weight loss. Ongoing studies will try to address this question, such as the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) surgery study, the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) trial in the U.S. (recruiting obese type 2 diabetic patients), and the Comprehensive Rimonabant Evaluation Study of Cardiovascular End Points and Outcomes (CRESCENDO) trial (by use of rimonabant versus placebo). This is very important, since previously, several observational studies in large population-based cohorts have indicated some detrimental effects of weight loss, even after intentional weight loss, with increased morbidity and mortality rates.},
  author       = {Nilsson, Peter},
  issn         = {1935-5548},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {278--283},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x73a0a90)},
  series       = {Diabetes Care},
  title        = {Is weight loss beneficial for reduction of morbidity and mortality? What is the controversy about?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc08-s268},
  volume       = {31 Suppl 2},
  year         = {2008},
}