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EPAGE Study Group. Current sedation and monitoring practice for colonoscopy: an international observational study (EPAGE)

Froehlich, F ; Harris, J K ; Wietlisbach, V ; Burnand, B ; Vader, J-P ; Gonvers, J-J ; EPAGE Study Group, The ; Fork, Thomas LU ; Benoni, Cecilia LU and al, et (2006) In Endoscopy 38(5). p.461-469
Abstract
Background and Study Aims: Sedation and monitoring practice during colonoscopy varies between centers and over time. Knowledge of current practice is needed to ensure quality of care and help focus future research. The objective of this study was to examine sedation and monitoring practice in endoscopy centers internationally.

Patients and Methods: This observational study included consecutive patients referred for colonoscopy at 21 centers in 11 countries. Endoscopists reported sedation and monitoring practice, using a standard questionnaire for each patient.

Results: 6004 patients were included in this study, of whom 53 % received conscious/moderate sedation during colonoscopy, 30 % received deep sedation, and 17 %... (More)
Background and Study Aims: Sedation and monitoring practice during colonoscopy varies between centers and over time. Knowledge of current practice is needed to ensure quality of care and help focus future research. The objective of this study was to examine sedation and monitoring practice in endoscopy centers internationally.

Patients and Methods: This observational study included consecutive patients referred for colonoscopy at 21 centers in 11 countries. Endoscopists reported sedation and monitoring practice, using a standard questionnaire for each patient.

Results: 6004 patients were included in this study, of whom 53 % received conscious/moderate sedation during colonoscopy, 30 % received deep sedation, and 17 % received no sedation. Sedation agents most commonly used were midazolam (47 %) and opioids (33 %). Pulse oximetry was done during colonoscopy in 77 % of patients, blood pressure monitoring in 34 %, and electrocardiography in 24 %. Pulse oximetry was most commonly used for moderately sedated patients, while blood pressure monitoring and electrocardiography were used predominantly for deeply sedated patients. Sedation and monitoring use ranged from 0 % to 100 % between centers. Oxygen desaturation (≤ 85 %) occurred in 5 % of patients, of whom 80 % were moderately sedated. On average, three staff members were involved in procedures. An anesthesiologist was present during 27 % of colonoscopies, and during 85 % of colonoscopies using deep sedation.

Conclusions: Internationally, sedation and monitoring practice during colonoscopy varied widely. Moderate sedation was the most common sedation method used and electronic monitoring was used in three-quarters of patients. Deep sedation tended to be more resource-intensive, implying a greater use of staff and monitoring. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Endoscopy
volume
38
issue
5
pages
461 - 469
publisher
Georg Thieme Verlag
external identifiers
  • scopus:33646726930
ISSN
1438-8812
DOI
10.1055/s-2006-925368
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7a60e6b9-973f-4bf4-af33-84d36b62d70e (old id 1136597)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 11:53:26
date last changed
2020-01-22 02:39:27
@article{7a60e6b9-973f-4bf4-af33-84d36b62d70e,
  abstract     = {Background and Study Aims: Sedation and monitoring practice during colonoscopy varies between centers and over time. Knowledge of current practice is needed to ensure quality of care and help focus future research. The objective of this study was to examine sedation and monitoring practice in endoscopy centers internationally.<br/><br>
Patients and Methods: This observational study included consecutive patients referred for colonoscopy at 21 centers in 11 countries. Endoscopists reported sedation and monitoring practice, using a standard questionnaire for each patient.<br/><br>
Results: 6004 patients were included in this study, of whom 53 % received conscious/moderate sedation during colonoscopy, 30 % received deep sedation, and 17 % received no sedation. Sedation agents most commonly used were midazolam (47 %) and opioids (33 %). Pulse oximetry was done during colonoscopy in 77 % of patients, blood pressure monitoring in 34 %, and electrocardiography in 24 %. Pulse oximetry was most commonly used for moderately sedated patients, while blood pressure monitoring and electrocardiography were used predominantly for deeply sedated patients. Sedation and monitoring use ranged from 0 % to 100 % between centers. Oxygen desaturation (≤ 85 %) occurred in 5 % of patients, of whom 80 % were moderately sedated. On average, three staff members were involved in procedures. An anesthesiologist was present during 27 % of colonoscopies, and during 85 % of colonoscopies using deep sedation.<br/><br>
Conclusions: Internationally, sedation and monitoring practice during colonoscopy varied widely. Moderate sedation was the most common sedation method used and electronic monitoring was used in three-quarters of patients. Deep sedation tended to be more resource-intensive, implying a greater use of staff and monitoring.},
  author       = {Froehlich, F and Harris, J K and Wietlisbach, V and Burnand, B and Vader, J-P and Gonvers, J-J and EPAGE Study Group, The and Fork, Thomas and Benoni, Cecilia and al, et},
  issn         = {1438-8812},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {461--469},
  publisher    = {Georg Thieme Verlag},
  series       = {Endoscopy},
  title        = {EPAGE Study Group. Current sedation and monitoring practice for colonoscopy: an international observational study (EPAGE)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2006-925368},
  doi          = {10.1055/s-2006-925368},
  volume       = {38},
  year         = {2006},
}