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Coffee Consumption and CYP1A2*1F Genotype Modify Age at Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Estrogen Receptor Status.

Bågeman, Erika LU ; Ingvar, Christian LU ; Rose, Carsten LU and Jernström, Helena LU (2008) In Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention 17(4). p.895-901
Abstract
CYP1A2 plays a key role in the metabolism of both estrogen and coffee. Women with higher coffee intake and the CYP1A2*1F A/A genotype have a ratio of high 2-hydroxyestrone (2-OHE1) to 16alpha-OHE1. 2-OHE1 is a weak estrogen and may even block the estrogen receptor (ER), whereas 16alpha-OHE1 is procarcinogenic. We hypothesized that moderate to high coffee consumption (>/=2 cups per day) combined with the CYP1A2*1F A/A genotype would be associated with a later age at diagnosis and a greater proportion of ER-negative (ER-) tumors among patients with breast cancer. We genotyped 458 patients with breast cancer (age, 25-99 years) in Lund, Sweden, for CYP1A2*1F. Information on lifestyle factors and tumor characteristics were obtained from... (More)
CYP1A2 plays a key role in the metabolism of both estrogen and coffee. Women with higher coffee intake and the CYP1A2*1F A/A genotype have a ratio of high 2-hydroxyestrone (2-OHE1) to 16alpha-OHE1. 2-OHE1 is a weak estrogen and may even block the estrogen receptor (ER), whereas 16alpha-OHE1 is procarcinogenic. We hypothesized that moderate to high coffee consumption (>/=2 cups per day) combined with the CYP1A2*1F A/A genotype would be associated with a later age at diagnosis and a greater proportion of ER-negative (ER-) tumors among patients with breast cancer. We genotyped 458 patients with breast cancer (age, 25-99 years) in Lund, Sweden, for CYP1A2*1F. Information on lifestyle factors and tumor characteristics were obtained from preoperative questionnaires and pathology reports. Among patients with CYP1A2*1F A/A (51.3%), moderate to high consumption was associated with a later age at diagnosis compared with low coffee consumption (59.8 versus 52.6 years, P = 0.0004). These patients were also more likely to have ER- tumors than patients with low consumption (14.7% versus 0%, P = 0.018). Coffee was not associated with ER status or age at diagnosis in patients with at least one C allele. Age at diagnosis was not associated with ER status in patients with CYP1A2*1F A/A, but younger patients (<50 years) with at least one C allele were more likely to have ER- tumors compared with older patients (odds ratio, 4.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.9-9.3; P = 0.0002). These findings raise the hypothesis that coffee slows the growth of ER-positive tumors in patients with CYP1A2*1F A/A and may have implications for breast cancer if confirmed. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2008;17(4):895-901). (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention
volume
17
issue
4
pages
895 - 901
publisher
American Association for Cancer Research
external identifiers
  • WOS:000254969000022
  • PMID:18398030
  • Scopus:42149088261
ISSN
1538-7755
DOI
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-07-0555
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
628e137b-919d-4077-bcf8-24cdd539f2b4 (old id 1147620)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18398030?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2008-05-08 08:57:46
date last changed
2016-10-30 04:36:31
@misc{628e137b-919d-4077-bcf8-24cdd539f2b4,
  abstract     = {CYP1A2 plays a key role in the metabolism of both estrogen and coffee. Women with higher coffee intake and the CYP1A2*1F A/A genotype have a ratio of high 2-hydroxyestrone (2-OHE1) to 16alpha-OHE1. 2-OHE1 is a weak estrogen and may even block the estrogen receptor (ER), whereas 16alpha-OHE1 is procarcinogenic. We hypothesized that moderate to high coffee consumption (&gt;/=2 cups per day) combined with the CYP1A2*1F A/A genotype would be associated with a later age at diagnosis and a greater proportion of ER-negative (ER-) tumors among patients with breast cancer. We genotyped 458 patients with breast cancer (age, 25-99 years) in Lund, Sweden, for CYP1A2*1F. Information on lifestyle factors and tumor characteristics were obtained from preoperative questionnaires and pathology reports. Among patients with CYP1A2*1F A/A (51.3%), moderate to high consumption was associated with a later age at diagnosis compared with low coffee consumption (59.8 versus 52.6 years, P = 0.0004). These patients were also more likely to have ER- tumors than patients with low consumption (14.7% versus 0%, P = 0.018). Coffee was not associated with ER status or age at diagnosis in patients with at least one C allele. Age at diagnosis was not associated with ER status in patients with CYP1A2*1F A/A, but younger patients (&lt;50 years) with at least one C allele were more likely to have ER- tumors compared with older patients (odds ratio, 4.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.9-9.3; P = 0.0002). These findings raise the hypothesis that coffee slows the growth of ER-positive tumors in patients with CYP1A2*1F A/A and may have implications for breast cancer if confirmed. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2008;17(4):895-901).},
  author       = {Bågeman, Erika and Ingvar, Christian and Rose, Carsten and Jernström, Helena},
  issn         = {1538-7755},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {895--901},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x899fa28)},
  series       = {Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention},
  title        = {Coffee Consumption and CYP1A2*1F Genotype Modify Age at Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Estrogen Receptor Status.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-07-0555},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2008},
}