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Somatostatin and neuropeptide Y in cerebrospinal fluid: correlations with severity of disease and clinical signs in Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia

Minthon, Lennart LU ; Edvinsson, Lars LU and Gustafson, Lars LU (1997) In Dementia and geriatric cognitive disorders 8(4). p.232-239
Abstract
Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are the most common types of progressive neurodegenerative disorder in our catchment area. The distribution of cortical degeneration in FTD is mainly the reverse of that in AD, while there are both differences and similarities in the clinical characteristics. Somatostatin and neuropeptide Y (NPY) are neuropeptides with a widespread distribution in the human cerebral cortex. Somatostatin is involved in the regulation of hormone release from the anterior pituitary and may act as a neurotransmitter-modulator. NPY is a potent anxiolytic neuropeptide. Somatostatin and NPY coexist in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and in amygdaloid complexes. The present study of AD (n = 34) and FTD... (More)
Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are the most common types of progressive neurodegenerative disorder in our catchment area. The distribution of cortical degeneration in FTD is mainly the reverse of that in AD, while there are both differences and similarities in the clinical characteristics. Somatostatin and neuropeptide Y (NPY) are neuropeptides with a widespread distribution in the human cerebral cortex. Somatostatin is involved in the regulation of hormone release from the anterior pituitary and may act as a neurotransmitter-modulator. NPY is a potent anxiolytic neuropeptide. Somatostatin and NPY coexist in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and in amygdaloid complexes. The present study of AD (n = 34) and FTD (n = 22) analyses the cerebrospinal-fluid (CSF) levels of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity and NPY-like immunoreactivity and correlates their levels to 54 different clinical items, such as restlessness, anxiety, irritability and depression. The CSF levels of the two neuropeptides somatostatin and NPY were significantly correlated in FTD (p < 0.02), but not in AD. Several significant correlations to the clinical signs were found: in AD disorientation and dyspraxia, and in FTD agitation, irritability and restlessness. Somatostatin showed a significant negative correlation with severity of dementia in AD (p < 0.013). (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Dementia and geriatric cognitive disorders
volume
8
issue
4
pages
232 - 239
publisher
Karger
DOI
10.1159/000106636
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2a69e9b8-31e0-4560-be2e-24244d25c969 (old id 1296440)
date added to LUP
2009-07-31 14:06:40
date last changed
2016-10-05 15:46:19
@misc{2a69e9b8-31e0-4560-be2e-24244d25c969,
  abstract     = {Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are the most common types of progressive neurodegenerative disorder in our catchment area. The distribution of cortical degeneration in FTD is mainly the reverse of that in AD, while there are both differences and similarities in the clinical characteristics. Somatostatin and neuropeptide Y (NPY) are neuropeptides with a widespread distribution in the human cerebral cortex. Somatostatin is involved in the regulation of hormone release from the anterior pituitary and may act as a neurotransmitter-modulator. NPY is a potent anxiolytic neuropeptide. Somatostatin and NPY coexist in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and in amygdaloid complexes. The present study of AD (n = 34) and FTD (n = 22) analyses the cerebrospinal-fluid (CSF) levels of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity and NPY-like immunoreactivity and correlates their levels to 54 different clinical items, such as restlessness, anxiety, irritability and depression. The CSF levels of the two neuropeptides somatostatin and NPY were significantly correlated in FTD (p &lt; 0.02), but not in AD. Several significant correlations to the clinical signs were found: in AD disorientation and dyspraxia, and in FTD agitation, irritability and restlessness. Somatostatin showed a significant negative correlation with severity of dementia in AD (p &lt; 0.013).},
  author       = {Minthon, Lennart and Edvinsson, Lars and Gustafson, Lars},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {232--239},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x9bdcf68)},
  series       = {Dementia and geriatric cognitive disorders},
  title        = {Somatostatin and neuropeptide Y in cerebrospinal fluid: correlations with severity of disease and clinical signs in Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000106636},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {1997},
}