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Inflammatory activity increases with haemoglobin A(1)c in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

Gustavsson, Carl Gunnar LU and Agardh, Carl-David LU (2009) In Scandinavian cardiovascular journal : SCJ 43(6). p.380-385
Abstract
Objective. To study the relationship between inflammation, diabetes and HbA(1)c levels in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Design. Single-centre cross-sectional study comprising 688 consecutive patients with ACS (108 with diabetes) and 341 with stable coronary artery disease (SCAD) (51 with diabetes). High-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), albumin and fibrinogen concentrations, erythrocyte sedimentation rates (ESR) and leukocyte counts were measured. Results. hsCRP, fibrinogen and ESR levels were higher and albumin lower in ACS patients. ESR was higher, albumin lower and hsCRP borderline significantly higher (p=0.053) in ACS patient with diabetes compared to those without. All inflammatory markers were associated with... (More)
Objective. To study the relationship between inflammation, diabetes and HbA(1)c levels in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Design. Single-centre cross-sectional study comprising 688 consecutive patients with ACS (108 with diabetes) and 341 with stable coronary artery disease (SCAD) (51 with diabetes). High-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), albumin and fibrinogen concentrations, erythrocyte sedimentation rates (ESR) and leukocyte counts were measured. Results. hsCRP, fibrinogen and ESR levels were higher and albumin lower in ACS patients. ESR was higher, albumin lower and hsCRP borderline significantly higher (p=0.053) in ACS patient with diabetes compared to those without. All inflammatory markers were associated with HbA(1)c in all 688 ACS patients as well as in 540 non-diabetic ACS patients with normal HbA(1)c. In multivariate analyses, all inflammatory markers were independently associated with HbA(1)c in the entire ACS group, regardless of diabetes being present or not. When non-diabetic ACS patients were analyzed separately, only ESR and leukocyte counts were independently correlated with HbA(1)c. Conclusions. Patients with ACS had increased inflammatory activity, which increased with HbA(1)c levels in patients who neither had a history of diabetes nor HbA(1)c above normal, and was further exaggerated in the presence of diabetes. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian cardiovascular journal : SCJ
volume
43
issue
6
pages
380 - 385
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • WOS:000272974500005
  • PMID:19291585
  • Scopus:72049129942
ISSN
1651-2006
DOI
10.1080/14017430902822999
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0a8e3066-4bb8-4edf-8fe7-b1769e5f6b2f (old id 1367731)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19291585?dopt=Abstract
http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14017430902822999
date added to LUP
2009-04-07 15:45:20
date last changed
2016-11-08 14:10:29
@misc{0a8e3066-4bb8-4edf-8fe7-b1769e5f6b2f,
  abstract     = {Objective. To study the relationship between inflammation, diabetes and HbA(1)c levels in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Design. Single-centre cross-sectional study comprising 688 consecutive patients with ACS (108 with diabetes) and 341 with stable coronary artery disease (SCAD) (51 with diabetes). High-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), albumin and fibrinogen concentrations, erythrocyte sedimentation rates (ESR) and leukocyte counts were measured. Results. hsCRP, fibrinogen and ESR levels were higher and albumin lower in ACS patients. ESR was higher, albumin lower and hsCRP borderline significantly higher (p=0.053) in ACS patient with diabetes compared to those without. All inflammatory markers were associated with HbA(1)c in all 688 ACS patients as well as in 540 non-diabetic ACS patients with normal HbA(1)c. In multivariate analyses, all inflammatory markers were independently associated with HbA(1)c in the entire ACS group, regardless of diabetes being present or not. When non-diabetic ACS patients were analyzed separately, only ESR and leukocyte counts were independently correlated with HbA(1)c. Conclusions. Patients with ACS had increased inflammatory activity, which increased with HbA(1)c levels in patients who neither had a history of diabetes nor HbA(1)c above normal, and was further exaggerated in the presence of diabetes.},
  author       = {Gustavsson, Carl Gunnar and Agardh, Carl-David},
  issn         = {1651-2006},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {380--385},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xcdfaab8)},
  series       = {Scandinavian cardiovascular journal : SCJ},
  title        = {Inflammatory activity increases with haemoglobin A(1)c in patients with acute coronary syndrome.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14017430902822999},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {2009},
}