Advanced

Trunk posture: reliability, accuracy, and risk estimates for low back pain from a video based assessment method

Neumann, Patrick LU ; Wells, R.P; Norman, R.W.; Kerr, M.S.; Frank, J. and Shannon, H.S. (2001) In International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics 28. p.355-365
Abstract
It has been recently reported that both dynamic movement characteristics, as well as the duration of postures adopted during work, are important in the development of low back pain (LBP). This paper presents a video-based posture assessment method capable of measuring trunk angles and angular velocities in industrial workplaces. The interobserver reliability, system accuracy, and the relationship of the measured exposures to the reporting of low back pain

are reported. The video analysis workstation consisted of a desktop computer equipped with digital video capture and playback technology, a VCR, and a computer game type joystick. The operator could then use a joystick to track trunk flexion and lateral bending during... (More)
It has been recently reported that both dynamic movement characteristics, as well as the duration of postures adopted during work, are important in the development of low back pain (LBP). This paper presents a video-based posture assessment method capable of measuring trunk angles and angular velocities in industrial workplaces. The interobserver reliability, system accuracy, and the relationship of the measured exposures to the reporting of low back pain

are reported. The video analysis workstation consisted of a desktop computer equipped with digital video capture and playback technology, a VCR, and a computer game type joystick. The operator could then use a joystick to track trunk flexion and lateral bending during computer-controlled video playback. The joystick buttons were used for binary input of twisting. The inter-observer reliability for peak flexion and percentage of time spent in posture category variables were excellent (ICC>0.8). Lower reliability levels were observed for peak and average velocity and movement related variables. The video analysis system time series data showed very high correlation to the criterion optoelectronic imaging system (r ¼ 0:92). Root mean square errors averaged 5.81 for the amplitude probability distribution function data. Trunk flexion variables including peak level, peak velocity, average velocity indicators, and percent time in flexion category indicators all showed significant differences between cases and controls in the epidemiological study. A model consisting of the measures peak trunk flexion, percent time in lateral bend and average lateral bending velocity emerged after multivariable analysis for relationship to low back pain. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Low back pain, Posture, Kinematics, Epidemiology, Accuracy, Reliability
in
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics
volume
28
pages
355 - 365
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • Scopus:0034768421
ISSN
0169-8141
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4230b112-63b7-4246-b195-f74327a8a5ca (old id 1472243)
date added to LUP
2009-09-07 11:14:39
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:49:12
@misc{4230b112-63b7-4246-b195-f74327a8a5ca,
  abstract     = {It has been recently reported that both dynamic movement characteristics, as well as the duration of postures adopted during work, are important in the development of low back pain (LBP). This paper presents a video-based posture assessment method capable of measuring trunk angles and angular velocities in industrial workplaces. The interobserver reliability, system accuracy, and the relationship of the measured exposures to the reporting of low back pain<br/><br>
are reported. The video analysis workstation consisted of a desktop computer equipped with digital video capture and playback technology, a VCR, and a computer game type joystick. The operator could then use a joystick to track trunk flexion and lateral bending during computer-controlled video playback. The joystick buttons were used for binary input of twisting. The inter-observer reliability for peak flexion and percentage of time spent in posture category variables were excellent (ICC&gt;0.8). Lower reliability levels were observed for peak and average velocity and movement related variables. The video analysis system time series data showed very high correlation to the criterion optoelectronic imaging system (r ¼ 0:92). Root mean square errors averaged 5.81 for the amplitude probability distribution function data. Trunk flexion variables including peak level, peak velocity, average velocity indicators, and percent time in flexion category indicators all showed significant differences between cases and controls in the epidemiological study. A model consisting of the measures peak trunk flexion, percent time in lateral bend and average lateral bending velocity emerged after multivariable analysis for relationship to low back pain.},
  author       = {Neumann, Patrick and Wells, R.P and Norman, R.W. and Kerr, M.S. and Frank, J. and Shannon, H.S.},
  issn         = {0169-8141},
  keyword      = {Low back pain,Posture,Kinematics,Epidemiology,Accuracy,Reliability},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {355--365},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xc7adcd0)},
  series       = {International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics},
  title        = {Trunk posture: reliability, accuracy, and risk estimates for low back pain from a video based assessment method},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2001},
}