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Hypogonadism Risk in Men Treated for Childhood Cancer.

Romerius, Patrik LU ; Ståhl, Olof LU ; Moëll, Christian LU ; Relander, Thomas LU ; Cavallin-Ståhl, Eva LU ; Wiebe, Thomas LU ; Giwercman, Yvonne LU and Giwercman, Aleksander LU (2009) In The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism 94. p.4180-4186
Abstract
Context: Pediatric cancer treatment may imply an increased risk of hypogonadism, leading to metabolic disorders and osteoporosis. Such complications are potentially preventable. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess diagnosis- and treatment-dependent risk of hypogonadism in male childhood cancer survivors (CCS). Design: Male CCS who were treated during the period 1970-2002 and who in 2004 were 18-45 yr of age were eligible. Setting: The study was conducted in a university hospital clinic. Patients: A consecutive group of CCS treated at Lund University Hospital was selected for the study, of whom 151 (38%) agreed to participate. Furthermore, 141 healthy fertile men served as controls. Interventions: We measured serum levels of free... (More)
Context: Pediatric cancer treatment may imply an increased risk of hypogonadism, leading to metabolic disorders and osteoporosis. Such complications are potentially preventable. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess diagnosis- and treatment-dependent risk of hypogonadism in male childhood cancer survivors (CCS). Design: Male CCS who were treated during the period 1970-2002 and who in 2004 were 18-45 yr of age were eligible. Setting: The study was conducted in a university hospital clinic. Patients: A consecutive group of CCS treated at Lund University Hospital was selected for the study, of whom 151 (38%) agreed to participate. Furthermore, 141 healthy fertile men served as controls. Interventions: We measured serum levels of free and total testosterone, SHBG, and LH. Main Outcome Measures: Odds ratios (OR) for biochemical hypogonadism, defined as total testosterone less than 10 nmol/liter and/or LH above 10 IU/liter, were calculated and related to type of cancer, treatment received, as well as testicular volume. Results: Hypogonadism was more commonly detected in CCS than in controls (OR, 6.7; 95% CI, 2.7, 17). The increased presence of hypogonadism was noted in the following treatment groups: brain surgery, chemotherapy (with and without radiotherapy), and testicular irradiation. Low total testicular volume (</=24 ml) was associated with a high risk of hypogonadism (OR, 31; 95% CI, 11, 92). Conclusion: Adult male survivors of childhood cancer are at risk of hypogonadism, which should be acknowledged in the long-term follow-up of these men. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism
volume
94
pages
4180 - 4186
publisher
The Endocrine Society
external identifiers
  • WOS:000271470800009
  • PMID:19789207
  • Scopus:70449101092
ISSN
1945-7197
DOI
10.1210/jc.2009-0337
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6ffaa23f-ffd5-4cc4-8a0a-5fc1278aa817 (old id 1500898)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19789207?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-11-04 12:15:42
date last changed
2016-11-09 14:39:54
@misc{6ffaa23f-ffd5-4cc4-8a0a-5fc1278aa817,
  abstract     = {Context: Pediatric cancer treatment may imply an increased risk of hypogonadism, leading to metabolic disorders and osteoporosis. Such complications are potentially preventable. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess diagnosis- and treatment-dependent risk of hypogonadism in male childhood cancer survivors (CCS). Design: Male CCS who were treated during the period 1970-2002 and who in 2004 were 18-45 yr of age were eligible. Setting: The study was conducted in a university hospital clinic. Patients: A consecutive group of CCS treated at Lund University Hospital was selected for the study, of whom 151 (38%) agreed to participate. Furthermore, 141 healthy fertile men served as controls. Interventions: We measured serum levels of free and total testosterone, SHBG, and LH. Main Outcome Measures: Odds ratios (OR) for biochemical hypogonadism, defined as total testosterone less than 10 nmol/liter and/or LH above 10 IU/liter, were calculated and related to type of cancer, treatment received, as well as testicular volume. Results: Hypogonadism was more commonly detected in CCS than in controls (OR, 6.7; 95% CI, 2.7, 17). The increased presence of hypogonadism was noted in the following treatment groups: brain surgery, chemotherapy (with and without radiotherapy), and testicular irradiation. Low total testicular volume (&lt;/=24 ml) was associated with a high risk of hypogonadism (OR, 31; 95% CI, 11, 92). Conclusion: Adult male survivors of childhood cancer are at risk of hypogonadism, which should be acknowledged in the long-term follow-up of these men.},
  author       = {Romerius, Patrik and Ståhl, Olof and Moëll, Christian and Relander, Thomas and Cavallin-Ståhl, Eva and Wiebe, Thomas and Giwercman, Yvonne and Giwercman, Aleksander},
  issn         = {1945-7197},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {4180--4186},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xa443258)},
  series       = {The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism},
  title        = {Hypogonadism Risk in Men Treated for Childhood Cancer.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/jc.2009-0337},
  volume       = {94},
  year         = {2009},
}