Advanced

The ABO blood group system revisited: a review and update.

Storry, Jill LU and Olsson, Martin L LU (2009) In Immunohematology / American Red Cross 25(2). p.48-59
Abstract
The antigens of the ABO system were the first to be recognized as blood groups and actually the first human genetic markers known. Their presence and the realization of naturally occurring antibodies to those antigens lacking from the cells made sense of the erratic failure of blood transfusion hitherto and opened up the possibility of a safe treatment practice in life-threatening blood loss. Although initially apparently simple, the ABO system has come to grow in complexity over the years. The mass of knowledge relating to carbohydrate chemistry, enzymology, molecular genetics, and structural and evolutionary biology is now enormous thanks to more than a century of research using ABO as a principal model. This has provided us with data to... (More)
The antigens of the ABO system were the first to be recognized as blood groups and actually the first human genetic markers known. Their presence and the realization of naturally occurring antibodies to those antigens lacking from the cells made sense of the erratic failure of blood transfusion hitherto and opened up the possibility of a safe treatment practice in life-threatening blood loss. Although initially apparently simple, the ABO system has come to grow in complexity over the years. The mass of knowledge relating to carbohydrate chemistry, enzymology, molecular genetics, and structural and evolutionary biology is now enormous thanks to more than a century of research using ABO as a principal model. This has provided us with data to form a solid platform of evidence-based transfusion and transplantation medicine used every day in laboratories and clinics around the globe. This review aims to summarize key findings and recent progress made toward further understanding of this surprisingly polymorphic system. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Immunohematology / American Red Cross
volume
25
issue
2
pages
48 - 59
publisher
American Red Cross
external identifiers
  • PMID:19927620
  • Scopus:70349578974
ISSN
0894-203X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
32472e0a-2128-4bab-9a74-123240e3f9ac (old id 1511729)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19927620?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-12-07 09:36:09
date last changed
2016-11-20 04:24:14
@misc{32472e0a-2128-4bab-9a74-123240e3f9ac,
  abstract     = {The antigens of the ABO system were the first to be recognized as blood groups and actually the first human genetic markers known. Their presence and the realization of naturally occurring antibodies to those antigens lacking from the cells made sense of the erratic failure of blood transfusion hitherto and opened up the possibility of a safe treatment practice in life-threatening blood loss. Although initially apparently simple, the ABO system has come to grow in complexity over the years. The mass of knowledge relating to carbohydrate chemistry, enzymology, molecular genetics, and structural and evolutionary biology is now enormous thanks to more than a century of research using ABO as a principal model. This has provided us with data to form a solid platform of evidence-based transfusion and transplantation medicine used every day in laboratories and clinics around the globe. This review aims to summarize key findings and recent progress made toward further understanding of this surprisingly polymorphic system.},
  author       = {Storry, Jill and Olsson, Martin L},
  issn         = {0894-203X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {48--59},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xaf2e9d0)},
  series       = {Immunohematology / American Red Cross},
  title        = {The ABO blood group system revisited: a review and update.},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2009},
}