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Perceived difficulties using everyday technology after acquired brain injury: Influence on activity and participation.

Lindén, Anita; Lexell, Jan LU and Lund, Maria Larsson (2010) In Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy 17. p.267-275
Abstract
Abstract Using everyday technology (ET) is a prerequisite for activities and participation at home and in the community. It is well known that persons with an acquired brain injury (ABI) can have limitations in activities of daily living but our knowledge of their difficulties using ET is not known. Thirty-six persons (27 men and 9 women, mean age 44 years, age range 26-60) with an ABI (2-10 years post injury) were interviewed, using the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (ETUQ), about their perceived difficulties using ET and how these difficulties influenced their everyday activities and their possibilities to participate at home and in the community. A majority (78%) of the persons reported difficulties using ET. The most common... (More)
Abstract Using everyday technology (ET) is a prerequisite for activities and participation at home and in the community. It is well known that persons with an acquired brain injury (ABI) can have limitations in activities of daily living but our knowledge of their difficulties using ET is not known. Thirty-six persons (27 men and 9 women, mean age 44 years, age range 26-60) with an ABI (2-10 years post injury) were interviewed, using the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (ETUQ), about their perceived difficulties using ET and how these difficulties influenced their everyday activities and their possibilities to participate at home and in the community. A majority (78%) of the persons reported difficulties using ET. The most common difficulties were related to the use of telecommunication and computers. Despite these difficulties, a majority still used most objects and services independently. Twenty-six participants (72%) perceived that their difficulties using ET influenced their everyday activities and their possibility to participate at home and in the community. The results indicate that rehabilitation following an ABI should consider whether clients' use of ET influences their activity and participation and adopt interventions accordingly. The results also indicate that difficulties using ET need to be considered in the design of community services to prevent societal barriers. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy
volume
17
pages
267 - 275
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • WOS:000284314900003
  • PMID:19903093
  • Scopus:78649254510
ISSN
1651-2014
DOI
10.3109/11038120903265022
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
89834b6d-6435-427a-814b-ad267169b60d (old id 1512089)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19903093?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-12-01 15:17:32
date last changed
2016-11-20 04:23:13
@misc{89834b6d-6435-427a-814b-ad267169b60d,
  abstract     = {Abstract Using everyday technology (ET) is a prerequisite for activities and participation at home and in the community. It is well known that persons with an acquired brain injury (ABI) can have limitations in activities of daily living but our knowledge of their difficulties using ET is not known. Thirty-six persons (27 men and 9 women, mean age 44 years, age range 26-60) with an ABI (2-10 years post injury) were interviewed, using the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (ETUQ), about their perceived difficulties using ET and how these difficulties influenced their everyday activities and their possibilities to participate at home and in the community. A majority (78%) of the persons reported difficulties using ET. The most common difficulties were related to the use of telecommunication and computers. Despite these difficulties, a majority still used most objects and services independently. Twenty-six participants (72%) perceived that their difficulties using ET influenced their everyday activities and their possibility to participate at home and in the community. The results indicate that rehabilitation following an ABI should consider whether clients' use of ET influences their activity and participation and adopt interventions accordingly. The results also indicate that difficulties using ET need to be considered in the design of community services to prevent societal barriers.},
  author       = {Lindén, Anita and Lexell, Jan and Lund, Maria Larsson},
  issn         = {1651-2014},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {267--275},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xa265f88)},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy},
  title        = {Perceived difficulties using everyday technology after acquired brain injury: Influence on activity and participation.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/11038120903265022},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2010},
}