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Why does dosage compensation differ between XY and ZW taxa?

Naurin, Sara LU ; Hansson, Bengt LU ; Bensch, Staffan LU and Hasselquist, Dennis LU (2010) In Trends in Genetics 26(1). p.15-20
Abstract
Recent studies have demonstrated an extensive male bias in the gene expression on Z chromosomes in species with a ZW sex determination (e.g. birds), suggesting that ZW females have incomplete dosage compensation. We propose that the extensive male bias on Z chromosomes is caused by the functional properties of male-adapted genes, which make them unsuitable for high expression in females, and that ZW females are dosage-compensated to a point where they have achieved enough compensation to maintain the integrity of critical networks. In ZW systems, Z chromosomes spend two-thirds of their evolutionary time in males, and pronounced sexual selection in males and the male mutation bias can interact and affect levels of sexual antagonism, causing... (More)
Recent studies have demonstrated an extensive male bias in the gene expression on Z chromosomes in species with a ZW sex determination (e.g. birds), suggesting that ZW females have incomplete dosage compensation. We propose that the extensive male bias on Z chromosomes is caused by the functional properties of male-adapted genes, which make them unsuitable for high expression in females, and that ZW females are dosage-compensated to a point where they have achieved enough compensation to maintain the integrity of critical networks. In ZW systems, Z chromosomes spend two-thirds of their evolutionary time in males, and pronounced sexual selection in males and the male mutation bias can interact and affect levels of sexual antagonism, causing more extensive male bias in gene expression on Z-linked genes. These patterns and processes contrast with those acting on genes on the X chromosome in XY species, and might help explain the discrepancies in the degree of sex-biased gene expression and dosage compensation in XY and ZW systems. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Trends in Genetics
volume
26
issue
1
pages
15 - 20
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • WOS:000273884400004
  • Scopus:72449137274
ISSN
1362-4555
DOI
10.1016/j.tig.2009.11.006
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
40893920-7309-48e7-bec7-8cb229b3a019 (old id 1523938)
date added to LUP
2010-01-15 10:52:28
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:50:04
@misc{40893920-7309-48e7-bec7-8cb229b3a019,
  abstract     = {Recent studies have demonstrated an extensive male bias in the gene expression on Z chromosomes in species with a ZW sex determination (e.g. birds), suggesting that ZW females have incomplete dosage compensation. We propose that the extensive male bias on Z chromosomes is caused by the functional properties of male-adapted genes, which make them unsuitable for high expression in females, and that ZW females are dosage-compensated to a point where they have achieved enough compensation to maintain the integrity of critical networks. In ZW systems, Z chromosomes spend two-thirds of their evolutionary time in males, and pronounced sexual selection in males and the male mutation bias can interact and affect levels of sexual antagonism, causing more extensive male bias in gene expression on Z-linked genes. These patterns and processes contrast with those acting on genes on the X chromosome in XY species, and might help explain the discrepancies in the degree of sex-biased gene expression and dosage compensation in XY and ZW systems.},
  author       = {Naurin, Sara and Hansson, Bengt and Bensch, Staffan and Hasselquist, Dennis},
  issn         = {1362-4555},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {15--20},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xa330cc8)},
  series       = {Trends in Genetics},
  title        = {Why does dosage compensation differ between XY and ZW taxa?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tig.2009.11.006},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2010},
}