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Social capital, economic conditions, marital status and daily smoking: a population-based study.

Lindström, Martin LU (2010) In Public Health 124(2). p.71-77
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between marital status and daily smoking, adjusting for economic conditions and trust. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: In total, 27,757 individuals aged 18-80 years answered a postal questionnaire, which represents 59% of the random sample. A logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between marital status and daily smoking, adjusting for economic (material) conditions and trust. A multivariate analysis was performed to investigate the importance of possible confounders concerning the differences in daily smoking according to marital status. RESULTS: Smoking prevalence was 14.9% among men and 18.1% among women. The odds ratios of daily smoking for middle-aged... (More)
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between marital status and daily smoking, adjusting for economic conditions and trust. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: In total, 27,757 individuals aged 18-80 years answered a postal questionnaire, which represents 59% of the random sample. A logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between marital status and daily smoking, adjusting for economic (material) conditions and trust. A multivariate analysis was performed to investigate the importance of possible confounders concerning the differences in daily smoking according to marital status. RESULTS: Smoking prevalence was 14.9% among men and 18.1% among women. The odds ratios of daily smoking for middle-aged respondents, born abroad, medium/low education, problems paying bills, low trust, and unmarried and (particularly) divorced respondents were significantly higher than those for their reference groups. Low trust was significantly higher among divorced and unmarried respondents compared with married/cohabitating respondents. Adjustment for economic conditions reduced the odds ratios of daily smoking among divorced subjects; this was not seen following adjustment for trust. CONCLUSIONS: Never-married subjects and (particularly) divorced subjects showed a significantly higher prevalence of daily smoking than married/cohabitating respondents. Economic conditions have a significant effect on the association between marital status and daily smoking, but this was not seen for trust. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Public Health
volume
124
issue
2
pages
71 - 77
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • WOS:000276734700003
  • PMID:20181369
  • Scopus:77950877525
ISSN
1476-5616
DOI
10.1016/j.puhe.2010.01.003
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7b0d160d-9c19-4d8c-88a3-0939ba357134 (old id 1582928)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20181369?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-04-06 11:14:58
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:25:36
@misc{7b0d160d-9c19-4d8c-88a3-0939ba357134,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between marital status and daily smoking, adjusting for economic conditions and trust. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: In total, 27,757 individuals aged 18-80 years answered a postal questionnaire, which represents 59% of the random sample. A logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between marital status and daily smoking, adjusting for economic (material) conditions and trust. A multivariate analysis was performed to investigate the importance of possible confounders concerning the differences in daily smoking according to marital status. RESULTS: Smoking prevalence was 14.9% among men and 18.1% among women. The odds ratios of daily smoking for middle-aged respondents, born abroad, medium/low education, problems paying bills, low trust, and unmarried and (particularly) divorced respondents were significantly higher than those for their reference groups. Low trust was significantly higher among divorced and unmarried respondents compared with married/cohabitating respondents. Adjustment for economic conditions reduced the odds ratios of daily smoking among divorced subjects; this was not seen following adjustment for trust. CONCLUSIONS: Never-married subjects and (particularly) divorced subjects showed a significantly higher prevalence of daily smoking than married/cohabitating respondents. Economic conditions have a significant effect on the association between marital status and daily smoking, but this was not seen for trust.},
  author       = {Lindström, Martin},
  issn         = {1476-5616},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {71--77},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x9b39eb8)},
  series       = {Public Health},
  title        = {Social capital, economic conditions, marital status and daily smoking: a population-based study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.puhe.2010.01.003},
  volume       = {124},
  year         = {2010},
}