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Fatal Acute Pancreatitis Occurring Outside of the Hospital: Clinical and Social Characteristics.

Andersson, Bodil LU ; Ansari, Daniel; Andersson, Ellen LU ; Persson, Sixten LU and Andersson, Roland LU (2010) In World Journal of Surgery Jul 1. p.2286-2291
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Mortality caused by acute pancreatitis in patients admitted to the hospital has been thoroughly investigated, but knowledge regarding outpatient fatalities is far from complete. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence and clinical characteristics of patients who have died due to acute pancreatitis occurring outside the hospital. METHODS: Deaths caused by acute pancreatitis in the southern part of Sweden during 1994-2008 were identified at the Department of Forensic Medicine, Lund. A retrospective review of all cases was performed. RESULTS: A total of 50 patients were included, representing approximately 50 of 292 (17%) of all deaths due to acute pancreatitis in the region during this period of time. Median age was... (More)
BACKGROUND: Mortality caused by acute pancreatitis in patients admitted to the hospital has been thoroughly investigated, but knowledge regarding outpatient fatalities is far from complete. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence and clinical characteristics of patients who have died due to acute pancreatitis occurring outside the hospital. METHODS: Deaths caused by acute pancreatitis in the southern part of Sweden during 1994-2008 were identified at the Department of Forensic Medicine, Lund. A retrospective review of all cases was performed. RESULTS: A total of 50 patients were included, representing approximately 50 of 292 (17%) of all deaths due to acute pancreatitis in the region during this period of time. Median age was 54 (47-69) years and the majority-37 (74%)-were men. The main etiology was alcohol, seen in at least 35 (70%) patients. Twelve (24%) patients were obese. The duration of abdominal pain, in evaluable cases, was 3.0 (1.6-6.2) days. Profound signs of pancreatitis were seen in all patients; 35 (70%) had a necrotising disease according to histopathological examination. Pulmonary changes were common, e.g., bronchopneumonia, pleural effusion, or edema, and all but four had fatty liver. Massive intra-abdominal bleeding was seen in one patient. At least eight patients had a mental disorder, and three were homeless. CONCLUSIONS: Fatal acute pancreatitis occurring outside the hospital accounts for a substantial part of all deaths due to the disease. The incidence seems to decline, and no variation in season was seen. Alcohol was the predominant etiology. Many of the patients lived alone and in poor social conditions. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
World Journal of Surgery
volume
Jul 1
pages
2286 - 2291
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • WOS:000282144300004
  • PMID:20574639
  • Scopus:77957138755
ISSN
1432-2323
DOI
10.1007/s00268-010-0693-z
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
75f6e9d6-680d-4874-ac2a-ce8ea38cdf5b (old id 1625742)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20574639?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2010-07-05 21:00:58
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:34:30
@misc{75f6e9d6-680d-4874-ac2a-ce8ea38cdf5b,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: Mortality caused by acute pancreatitis in patients admitted to the hospital has been thoroughly investigated, but knowledge regarding outpatient fatalities is far from complete. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence and clinical characteristics of patients who have died due to acute pancreatitis occurring outside the hospital. METHODS: Deaths caused by acute pancreatitis in the southern part of Sweden during 1994-2008 were identified at the Department of Forensic Medicine, Lund. A retrospective review of all cases was performed. RESULTS: A total of 50 patients were included, representing approximately 50 of 292 (17%) of all deaths due to acute pancreatitis in the region during this period of time. Median age was 54 (47-69) years and the majority-37 (74%)-were men. The main etiology was alcohol, seen in at least 35 (70%) patients. Twelve (24%) patients were obese. The duration of abdominal pain, in evaluable cases, was 3.0 (1.6-6.2) days. Profound signs of pancreatitis were seen in all patients; 35 (70%) had a necrotising disease according to histopathological examination. Pulmonary changes were common, e.g., bronchopneumonia, pleural effusion, or edema, and all but four had fatty liver. Massive intra-abdominal bleeding was seen in one patient. At least eight patients had a mental disorder, and three were homeless. CONCLUSIONS: Fatal acute pancreatitis occurring outside the hospital accounts for a substantial part of all deaths due to the disease. The incidence seems to decline, and no variation in season was seen. Alcohol was the predominant etiology. Many of the patients lived alone and in poor social conditions.},
  author       = {Andersson, Bodil and Ansari, Daniel and Andersson, Ellen and Persson, Sixten and Andersson, Roland},
  issn         = {1432-2323},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {2286--2291},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xa914500)},
  series       = {World Journal of Surgery},
  title        = {Fatal Acute Pancreatitis Occurring Outside of the Hospital: Clinical and Social Characteristics.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00268-010-0693-z},
  volume       = {Jul 1},
  year         = {2010},
}