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Knowledge of evolution and evolution of knowledge

Löfgren, Lars LU (1981) In The evolutionary vision : toward a unifying paradigm of physical, biological, and sociocultural evolution p.129-151
Abstract
It is argued that evolution goes beyond that which can be described in a well-defined language) and that it instead enforces a language that is itself evolving. Evolution is the unfolding of this self-reference. The unfolding methodology of the logician Alfred Tarski is taken as a basis for the

explicability of evolution. Looking at Tarski´s results as a linguistic complementarity, we get a view with the productivity of this complementarity as the srource of evolutionary phenomena. These extend to the biological domain upon recognition of life as an autolinguistic phenomenon.

In particular, a describability theory for induction (the epistemological counterpart to biological natural selection) is developed. It explains how... (More)
It is argued that evolution goes beyond that which can be described in a well-defined language) and that it instead enforces a language that is itself evolving. Evolution is the unfolding of this self-reference. The unfolding methodology of the logician Alfred Tarski is taken as a basis for the

explicability of evolution. Looking at Tarski´s results as a linguistic complementarity, we get a view with the productivity of this complementarity as the srource of evolutionary phenomena. These extend to the biological domain upon recognition of life as an autolinguistic phenomenon.

In particular, a describability theory for induction (the epistemological counterpart to biological natural selection) is developed. It explains how induction functions can exist, although not effectively describable. Furthermore, the so called Popper-Carnap controversy is found to have a natural

origin in the linguistic complementarity. Another question under philosophical debate, that of self-supporting rules of induction, is analyzed in terms of the describability theory and found to have a positive answer. Finally, a

systems approach to evolution of knowledge is outlined, aiming at extensions of fragmented areas of knowledge to uncover cyclic connections, admitting self-consistency as a criterion for acceptability. The method for establishing

self-consistency is the basic unfolding, the divergence of which entertains the evolutionary process. Underneath is the productivity of the linguistic complementarity. By comparison such a productivity seems to be lacking in the complementarity conception of Bohr. The systems approach is compared with

"bootstrap" philosopby in physics. (Less)
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Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
in
The evolutionary vision : toward a unifying paradigm of physical, biological, and sociocultural evolution
editor
Jantsch, Erich
pages
129 - 151
publisher
Westview Press
ISBN
0-86531-140-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
269cb4d9-1d9f-4921-966e-92ee14876866 (old id 1744446)
date added to LUP
2010-12-13 14:24:26
date last changed
2016-04-16 10:09:28
@misc{269cb4d9-1d9f-4921-966e-92ee14876866,
  abstract     = {It is argued that evolution goes beyond that which can be described in a well-defined language) and that it instead enforces a language that is itself evolving. Evolution is the unfolding of this self-reference. The unfolding methodology of the logician Alfred Tarski is taken as a basis for the<br/><br>
explicability of evolution. Looking at Tarski´s results as a linguistic complementarity, we get a view with the productivity of this complementarity as the srource of evolutionary phenomena. These extend to the biological domain upon recognition of life as an autolinguistic phenomenon.<br/><br>
In particular, a describability theory for induction (the epistemological counterpart to biological natural selection) is developed. It explains how induction functions can exist, although not effectively describable. Furthermore, the so called Popper-Carnap controversy is found to have a natural<br/><br>
origin in the linguistic complementarity. Another question under philosophical debate, that of self-supporting rules of induction, is analyzed in terms of the describability theory and found to have a positive answer. Finally, a<br/><br>
systems approach to evolution of knowledge is outlined, aiming at extensions of fragmented areas of knowledge to uncover cyclic connections, admitting self-consistency as a criterion for acceptability. The method for establishing<br/><br>
self-consistency is the basic unfolding, the divergence of which entertains the evolutionary process. Underneath is the productivity of the linguistic complementarity. By comparison such a productivity seems to be lacking in the complementarity conception of Bohr. The systems approach is compared with<br/><br>
"bootstrap" philosopby in physics.},
  author       = {Löfgren, Lars},
  editor       = {Jantsch, Erich},
  isbn         = {0-86531-140-4},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {129--151},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x9d8c1e0)},
  series       = {The evolutionary vision : toward a unifying paradigm of physical, biological, and sociocultural evolution},
  title        = {Knowledge of evolution and evolution of knowledge},
  year         = {1981},
}