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Animal mouthpieces for human properties and indentity - A Scandinavian perspective

Jennbert, Kristina LU (2010) In Bestial Mirrors. Using animals to construct human identities in Medieval Europe 03. p.39-45
Abstract
Peoples' relations to animals and their various roles took many different expressions in the pre-Christian era. In certain contexts animals had practical functions, but others they also had symbolic values. Domsticated animals were a kind of life style metaphors in grave rituals. Wild animals and transformation between humans and animals in pictorial images signified social identity. The archaeological analysis of pre-Christian use of animals, and the interpretation of relations between humans and animals give a historical background to the later textbased Old Norse mythology.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
social identity, Animals, life style metaphors, paganism, Old Norse religion, falconry
in
Bestial Mirrors. Using animals to construct human identities in Medieval Europe
editor
Kucera, Matthias and Kunst, Günther Karl
volume
03
pages
39 - 45
publisher
VIAS. Vienna Institute for Archaeological Science, Vienna University
ISBN
978-3-200-01895-2
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
933eb3ed-9f18-4260-9991-0ff07395d481 (old id 1770537)
date added to LUP
2011-01-27 17:20:29
date last changed
2016-04-16 07:46:18
@misc{933eb3ed-9f18-4260-9991-0ff07395d481,
  abstract     = {Peoples' relations to animals and their various roles took many different expressions in the pre-Christian era. In certain contexts animals had practical functions, but others they also had symbolic values. Domsticated animals were a kind of life style metaphors in grave rituals. Wild animals and transformation between humans and animals in pictorial images signified social identity. The archaeological analysis of pre-Christian use of animals, and the interpretation of relations between humans and animals give a historical background to the later textbased Old Norse mythology.},
  author       = {Jennbert, Kristina},
  editor       = {Kucera, Matthias and Kunst, Günther Karl},
  isbn         = {978-3-200-01895-2},
  keyword      = {social identity,Animals,life style metaphors,paganism,Old Norse religion,falconry},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {39--45},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x9e0fb98)},
  series       = {Bestial Mirrors. Using animals to construct human identities in Medieval Europe},
  title        = {Animal mouthpieces for human properties and indentity - A Scandinavian perspective},
  volume       = {03},
  year         = {2010},
}