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Early postural blood pressure response and cause-specific mortality among middle-aged adults.

Fedorowski, Artur LU ; Hedblad, Bo LU and Melander, Olle LU (2011) In European Journal of Epidemiology 26. p.537-546
Abstract
Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is associated with increased total mortality but contribution of specific death causes has not been thoroughly explored. In this prospective study, authors followed up 32,068 individuals without baseline history of cancer or cardiovascular disease (69% men; mean age, 46 years; range, 26-61 years) over a period of 24 years. Hazard ratios (HRs) for total and cause-specific mortality associated with presence of OH and by quartiles of postural systolic blood pressure response (∆SBP) were assessed using multivariate adjusted Cox regression model. A total of 7,145 deaths (22.3%, 9.4 deaths/1,000 person-years) occurred during follow-up. Those with OH (n = 1,943) had higher risk of death due to injury (HR, 1.88;... (More)
Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is associated with increased total mortality but contribution of specific death causes has not been thoroughly explored. In this prospective study, authors followed up 32,068 individuals without baseline history of cancer or cardiovascular disease (69% men; mean age, 46 years; range, 26-61 years) over a period of 24 years. Hazard ratios (HRs) for total and cause-specific mortality associated with presence of OH and by quartiles of postural systolic blood pressure response (∆SBP) were assessed using multivariate adjusted Cox regression model. A total of 7,145 deaths (22.3%, 9.4 deaths/1,000 person-years) occurred during follow-up. Those with OH (n = 1,943) had higher risk of death due to injury (HR, 1.88; 1.37-2.57) and neurological disease (HR, 2.21; 1.39-3.51). Analogically, risk of death caused by injury and neurological disease increased across the quartiles of ∆SBP from hyper- (Q1(SBP), +8.5 ± 4.7 mmHg) to hypotensive response (Q4(SBP), -13.7 ± 5.7 mmHg; HR, 1.32; 1.00-1.72, and 1.84; 1.20-2.82, respectively) as did also risk of death due to respiratory disease (Q4(SBP) vs. Q1(SBP): HR, 1.53; 1.14-2.04). In contrast, risk curve for cerebrovascular death was U-shaped with nadir in the mildly hypotensive 3rd quartile of ∆SBP (-5.0 ± 0.1 mmHg, Q3(SBP) vs. Q1(SBP): HR, 0.75; 0.54-1.03; P for linear trend = 0.021). Additionally, cardiovascular mortality was increased among 5,805 rescreened participants (mean age, 53 years; 9.8% OH positive: HR, 1.54; 1.24-1.89, and Q4(SBP) vs. Q1(SBP): 1.27; 1.02-1.57, respectively). In summary, increased mortality predicted by blood pressure fall on standing is associated with injuries, neurodegenerative, and respiratory diseases, as well as with cardiovascular disease in older adults. Moreover, both increase and pronounced decrease of SBP during early orthostasis indicate higher risk of cerebrovascular death. (Less)
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organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
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in
European Journal of Epidemiology
volume
26
pages
537 - 546
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • WOS:000293165100004
  • PMID:21487956
  • Scopus:79960996521
ISSN
1573-7284
DOI
10.1007/s10654-011-9578-1
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
54d93442-9040-4d58-94ee-648739b96182 (old id 1937215)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21487956?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2011-05-02 12:07:06
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:23:03
@misc{54d93442-9040-4d58-94ee-648739b96182,
  abstract     = {Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is associated with increased total mortality but contribution of specific death causes has not been thoroughly explored. In this prospective study, authors followed up 32,068 individuals without baseline history of cancer or cardiovascular disease (69% men; mean age, 46 years; range, 26-61 years) over a period of 24 years. Hazard ratios (HRs) for total and cause-specific mortality associated with presence of OH and by quartiles of postural systolic blood pressure response (∆SBP) were assessed using multivariate adjusted Cox regression model. A total of 7,145 deaths (22.3%, 9.4 deaths/1,000 person-years) occurred during follow-up. Those with OH (n = 1,943) had higher risk of death due to injury (HR, 1.88; 1.37-2.57) and neurological disease (HR, 2.21; 1.39-3.51). Analogically, risk of death caused by injury and neurological disease increased across the quartiles of ∆SBP from hyper- (Q1(SBP), +8.5 ± 4.7 mmHg) to hypotensive response (Q4(SBP), -13.7 ± 5.7 mmHg; HR, 1.32; 1.00-1.72, and 1.84; 1.20-2.82, respectively) as did also risk of death due to respiratory disease (Q4(SBP) vs. Q1(SBP): HR, 1.53; 1.14-2.04). In contrast, risk curve for cerebrovascular death was U-shaped with nadir in the mildly hypotensive 3rd quartile of ∆SBP (-5.0 ± 0.1 mmHg, Q3(SBP) vs. Q1(SBP): HR, 0.75; 0.54-1.03; P for linear trend = 0.021). Additionally, cardiovascular mortality was increased among 5,805 rescreened participants (mean age, 53 years; 9.8% OH positive: HR, 1.54; 1.24-1.89, and Q4(SBP) vs. Q1(SBP): 1.27; 1.02-1.57, respectively). In summary, increased mortality predicted by blood pressure fall on standing is associated with injuries, neurodegenerative, and respiratory diseases, as well as with cardiovascular disease in older adults. Moreover, both increase and pronounced decrease of SBP during early orthostasis indicate higher risk of cerebrovascular death.},
  author       = {Fedorowski, Artur and Hedblad, Bo and Melander, Olle},
  issn         = {1573-7284},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {537--546},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x855e9a0)},
  series       = {European Journal of Epidemiology},
  title        = {Early postural blood pressure response and cause-specific mortality among middle-aged adults.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10654-011-9578-1},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2011},
}