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The Relationship Between Cardiac Reactivity in the Laboratory and in Real Life

Johnston, Derek; Tuomisto, Martti and Patching, Geoffrey LU (2008) In Health Psychology 27(1). p.34-42
Abstract
Objective: An excessive cardiovascular response to acute stress is a probable risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) disease. Such reactivity is usually assessed from the CV response to laboratory stressors.

However, if it is a risk factor, correlated responses must occur in real life. Design: In the present study, we investigated the relationship between the heart rate (HR) response to five laboratory stressors and HR reactivity in the field. Measures: HR variation, the response to a real life stressor (public speaking), and

the increase in HR with periods of self-reported tense arousal. Ambulatory HR, activity and posture were measured continuously over a 7-hr period. Results: The HR increase to laboratory stressors did... (More)
Objective: An excessive cardiovascular response to acute stress is a probable risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) disease. Such reactivity is usually assessed from the CV response to laboratory stressors.

However, if it is a risk factor, correlated responses must occur in real life. Design: In the present study, we investigated the relationship between the heart rate (HR) response to five laboratory stressors and HR reactivity in the field. Measures: HR variation, the response to a real life stressor (public speaking), and

the increase in HR with periods of self-reported tense arousal. Ambulatory HR, activity and posture were measured continuously over a 7-hr period. Results: The HR increase to laboratory stressors did not relate to HR variation consistently, but it did relate to the other two field measures. Conclusion: The results suggested that a tendency to increased HR reactivity may be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease when combined with exposure to stress. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
real life stressors, laboratory stressors, heart rate, cardiac reactivity, public speaking
in
Health Psychology
volume
27
issue
1
pages
34 - 42
publisher
American Psychological Association (APA)
external identifiers
  • Scopus:38949151974
DOI
10.1037/0278-6133.27.1.34
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
d86ab420-d7d9-4137-84da-07804405e512 (old id 2370398)
date added to LUP
2012-03-21 13:44:54
date last changed
2016-10-13 04:42:18
@misc{d86ab420-d7d9-4137-84da-07804405e512,
  abstract     = {Objective: An excessive cardiovascular response to acute stress is a probable risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) disease. Such reactivity is usually assessed from the CV response to laboratory stressors.<br/><br>
However, if it is a risk factor, correlated responses must occur in real life. Design: In the present study, we investigated the relationship between the heart rate (HR) response to five laboratory stressors and HR reactivity in the field. Measures: HR variation, the response to a real life stressor (public speaking), and<br/><br>
the increase in HR with periods of self-reported tense arousal. Ambulatory HR, activity and posture were measured continuously over a 7-hr period. Results: The HR increase to laboratory stressors did not relate to HR variation consistently, but it did relate to the other two field measures. Conclusion: The results suggested that a tendency to increased HR reactivity may be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease when combined with exposure to stress.},
  author       = {Johnston, Derek and Tuomisto, Martti and Patching, Geoffrey},
  keyword      = {real life stressors,laboratory stressors,heart rate,cardiac reactivity,public speaking},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {34--42},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0xbde9dd0)},
  series       = {Health Psychology},
  title        = {The Relationship Between Cardiac Reactivity in the Laboratory and in Real Life},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0278-6133.27.1.34},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2008},
}