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Improving Access to Evidenced Based Psychological Treatments for Children & Adolescents in the UK

Perrin, Sean LU (2011) EABCT 2011 Congress In [Host publication title missing]
Abstract
Beginning in 2002, the Department of Health (DoH) n partnership with the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) began publishing

guidelines for the evidenced-based care and treatment of individuals with specific psychiatric disorders. With few exceptions the first-line

psychological treatment recommended in all of the guidelines was some form of CBT. The publications of these guidelines led to a reassessment

of the CBT capacity needed to provide this recommended treatment. Out of this assessment was born the Improving Access to

Psychological Therapies programme (IAPT) - which aimed to train 10,000 new CBT therapists to provide low and high intensity CBT to

adults with anxiety and... (More)
Beginning in 2002, the Department of Health (DoH) n partnership with the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) began publishing

guidelines for the evidenced-based care and treatment of individuals with specific psychiatric disorders. With few exceptions the first-line

psychological treatment recommended in all of the guidelines was some form of CBT. The publications of these guidelines led to a reassessment

of the CBT capacity needed to provide this recommended treatment. Out of this assessment was born the Improving Access to

Psychological Therapies programme (IAPT) - which aimed to train 10,000 new CBT therapists to provide low and high intensity CBT to

adults with anxiety and depression. Building on the success of this programme, the DoH has decided to extend the IAPT so that children

with anxiety, depression and behaviour disorders might also gain improved access to CBT. This presentation details the training curriculum

(core skills and disorder-based training, supervision and assessment requirements) and the service modernization changes (improving

care pathways, weekly outcome measurement, building local CBT supervision capacity and stakeholder involvement) imposed on clinical

services that send staff for IAPT training. Drawing on his experience of CBT dissemination in the UK and Europe, the presenter discusses

the issues that this new iteration of IAPT will need to address (low CBT supervision capacity, problems of staff retention after training,

competition between professional groups, and cultural resistance to assigning diagnoses to and repeated assessment of children) if it is to

be as successful as its adult counterpart. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
in
[Host publication title missing]
editor
Njardvik, Urdur
pages
1 pages
publisher
European Association of Behavioural & Cognitive Psychotherapy
conference name
EABCT 2011 Congress
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
c2672b8b-4dd0-46c2-8ef8-d678ae396db9 (old id 2374684)
alternative location
http://www.congress.is/eabct/
date added to LUP
2012-03-30 13:13:54
date last changed
2016-06-29 08:56:07
@misc{c2672b8b-4dd0-46c2-8ef8-d678ae396db9,
  abstract     = {Beginning in 2002, the Department of Health (DoH) n partnership with the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) began publishing<br/><br>
guidelines for the evidenced-based care and treatment of individuals with specific psychiatric disorders. With few exceptions the first-line<br/><br>
psychological treatment recommended in all of the guidelines was some form of CBT. The publications of these guidelines led to a reassessment<br/><br>
of the CBT capacity needed to provide this recommended treatment. Out of this assessment was born the Improving Access to<br/><br>
Psychological Therapies programme (IAPT) - which aimed to train 10,000 new CBT therapists to provide low and high intensity CBT to<br/><br>
adults with anxiety and depression. Building on the success of this programme, the DoH has decided to extend the IAPT so that children<br/><br>
with anxiety, depression and behaviour disorders might also gain improved access to CBT. This presentation details the training curriculum<br/><br>
(core skills and disorder-based training, supervision and assessment requirements) and the service modernization changes (improving<br/><br>
care pathways, weekly outcome measurement, building local CBT supervision capacity and stakeholder involvement) imposed on clinical<br/><br>
services that send staff for IAPT training. Drawing on his experience of CBT dissemination in the UK and Europe, the presenter discusses<br/><br>
the issues that this new iteration of IAPT will need to address (low CBT supervision capacity, problems of staff retention after training,<br/><br>
competition between professional groups, and cultural resistance to assigning diagnoses to and repeated assessment of children) if it is to<br/><br>
be as successful as its adult counterpart.},
  author       = {Perrin, Sean},
  editor       = {Njardvik, Urdur},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1},
  publisher    = {ARRAY(0x94378d8)},
  series       = {[Host publication title missing]},
  title        = {Improving Access to Evidenced Based Psychological Treatments for Children & Adolescents in the UK},
  year         = {2011},
}